2011
DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-3164.2011.00979.x
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Evaluation of the bacterial microflora of the conjunctival sac of healthy dogs and dogs with atopic dermatitis

Abstract: The aim of this case-control study was to evaluate and compare the bacterial microflora from the conjunctival sac of dogs with atopic dermatitis and healthy dogs. Twenty-one atopic dogs without clinical and/or cytopathological signs of bacterial blepharoconjunctivitis and 21 breed-matched healthy dogs were enrolled. Under topical anaesthesia, the inferior conjunctival sac of one eye was scraped twice. Material was collected with a Kimura spatula, spread over a slide and stained with a Diff Quick(®) -type stain… Show more

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Cited by 27 publications
(26 citation statements)
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References 41 publications
(97 reference statements)
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“…Using culture-based methods, the skin and nasal mucous membranes of atopic human patients [15], [44] and dogs [21], [45] are more often colonized with S. aureus and S. pseudintermedius , respectively, than healthy patients. Based on 16S rRNA pyrosequencing data, S. aureus markedly dominated affected skin regions, more commonly the antecubital and popliteal creases, in children with AD.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Using culture-based methods, the skin and nasal mucous membranes of atopic human patients [15], [44] and dogs [21], [45] are more often colonized with S. aureus and S. pseudintermedius , respectively, than healthy patients. Based on 16S rRNA pyrosequencing data, S. aureus markedly dominated affected skin regions, more commonly the antecubital and popliteal creases, in children with AD.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Flare states in atopic humans and dogs are associated with colonization and/or superficial infection by Staphylococcus species: S. aureus in humans and S. pseudintermedius or S. schleiferi in dogs (Fazakerley et al, 2009; Furiani et al, 2011; Kong et al, 2012; Leyden et al, 1974; Santoro et al, 2015). Recent studies in an Adam17-deficient mouse model suggest that S. aureus drives lesion formation (Kobayashi et al, 2015).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…One study looked at how the microbiota in dogs change with atopic flares and treatments, and found that treatment results in normalization of the bacterial communities [19]. Dogs with allergic skin disease, such as atopic dermatitis (AD), are colonized by a different microbiota than healthy dogs [9, 19, 23, 24]. …”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%