2020
DOI: 10.3389/fmicb.2020.00461
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Evaluation of High-Pressure Processing in Inactivation of the Hepatitis E Virus

Abstract: Hepatitis E virus (HEV) causes acute hepatitis with approximately 20 million cases per year globally. Based on genetic diversity, HEV is classified into different genotypes, with genotype 3 (HEV-3) being most prevalent in Europe and North America. The transmission of HEV-3 has been shown to be zoonotic and mainly associated with the consumption of raw or undercooked pork products. Herein, we investigated the efficacy of high-pressure processing (HPP) in inactivation of HEV-3 using a cell culture system. HPP ha… Show more

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Cited by 8 publications
(3 citation statements)
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“…The majority of studies on the effect of HPP treatment on microorganisms in foods were conducted for bacteria, and fewer studies were established for foodborne viruses [12,43]. However, studies on the effect of HPP treatment on foodborne viruses in foods have increased in recent years [13][14][15][16][17][18]. The initial study of HPP treatment on viruses' sensitivity was conducted in 1929, by examining a non-enveloped plant virus, the tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) [44], while Basset et al [45] reported that a HPP treatment of 800 MPa for 45 min proved adequate for the inactivation of TMV.…”
Section: Foodborne Viruses' Inactivation By Hppmentioning
confidence: 99%
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“…The majority of studies on the effect of HPP treatment on microorganisms in foods were conducted for bacteria, and fewer studies were established for foodborne viruses [12,43]. However, studies on the effect of HPP treatment on foodborne viruses in foods have increased in recent years [13][14][15][16][17][18]. The initial study of HPP treatment on viruses' sensitivity was conducted in 1929, by examining a non-enveloped plant virus, the tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) [44], while Basset et al [45] reported that a HPP treatment of 800 MPa for 45 min proved adequate for the inactivation of TMV.…”
Section: Foodborne Viruses' Inactivation By Hppmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) during a HPP treatment of 600 MPa for 10-15 s at ambient temperature showed decreases of 5-6 log and 0.5-2 log in chicken meat homogenate and eggs, respectively [76]. Nasheri et al [15] reported that at HPP of 600 MPa for 5 min, HEV was decreased by 2 and 0.5 log in laboratory media and pork pâté, respectively, and concluded that HPP treatment may not be sufficient to mitigate the risk of HEV in pork pâté.…”
Section: Non-processing Parametersmentioning
confidence: 99%
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