2001
DOI: 10.1590/s1519-566x2001000300030
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Evaluation of Electronic Mosquito-Repelling Devices Using Aedes albopictus (Skuse) (Diptera: Culicidae)

Abstract: Avaliação de Aparelhos Eletrônicos Repelentes de MosquitosUsando-se Aedes albopictus (Skuse) (Diptera: Culicidae) RESUMO PALAVRAS-CHAVE: Insecta, repelente, mosquito, ultra-som.ABSTRACT -The mosquito-repelling devices Anti-Pic®, Mosquito Repeller® DX-600 and Bye-Bye Mosquito® were evaluated in boxes for experimentation by exposing human hands to Aedes albopictus (Skuse) adults. Two sets of tests were performed based on 15 min. expositions. In the first set both hands were introduced in the box, one of them h… Show more

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Cited by 10 publications
(10 citation statements)
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“…(2000), Jensen et al. (2000), and Andrade & Bueno (2001) showed the same. However, despite the lack of any publication confirming efficacy, the commercialization of new electronic mosquito repellent devices is still ongoing in many countries.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 68%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…(2000), Jensen et al. (2000), and Andrade & Bueno (2001) showed the same. However, despite the lack of any publication confirming efficacy, the commercialization of new electronic mosquito repellent devices is still ongoing in many countries.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 68%
“…Furthermore, in 2003, SK Telecom (Jung-gu, Seoul, South Korea) offered a service via mobile telephone that generated sound waves undetectable to the human ear but able to repel mosquitoes within a range of 1 m. Subscribers were able to download the service for about US $2.5 (Anonymous, O Estado de São Paulo -Tecnologia, 10 July 2003). Coro & Suárez (1998) reviewed many publications, confirming the lack of efficacy of electronic repellers, and the later papers of Sylla et al (2000), Jensen et al (2000), and Andrade & Bueno (2001) showed the same. However, despite the lack of any publication confirming efficacy, the commercialization of new electronic mosquito repellent devices is still ongoing in many countries.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 88%
“…Sound has over the years been used to scare off pest species, with its humble origins of loud claps and yells in ancient agricultural fields, and now ultrasound producing electronic repellents (EMR) are used in combating mosquitoes (Antonelli et al, 2007;Simeon et al, 2013;Aflitto and DeGomez, 2014). Evaluation experiments with mosquito-repelling devices which included the Anti-Pic®, Mosquito Repeller® DX-600 and Bye-Bye Mosquito® done by exposing human hands to Aedes albopictus (Skuse) adults showed insignificant success in repellency, failing to confirm the 30.3 % repellency due to Anti-Pic® initially determined (Andrade and Bueno, 2001). The electronic mosquito-repelling devices studied ranged from 2kHz to 60 kHz in frequency with harmonic peaks from 4 kHz to 68 kHz (Rutledge et al, 1985;Combemale et al, 1992).…”
Section: Highlights Of the Worldwide Malaria Situation And Interventionsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The electronic mosquito-repelling devices studied ranged from 2kHz to 60 kHz in frequency with harmonic peaks from 4 kHz to 68 kHz (Rutledge et al, 1985;Combemale et al, 1992). Also, experiments with functioning electronic mosquito repellents (EMR) mimicking calls from bats and male Anopheles gambiae in the frequency range of 125 Hz to 74.6 kHz showed that 12 out of 15 field experiments yielded higher landing rate on the human bare body parts than the control experiments (Andrade and Bueno, 2001;Center For the Advancement Of Health, 2007;. The EMRs are used indoors and outdoors and are purported to repel mosquitoes within a range of 2.5 m (CAH, 2007).…”
Section: Highlights Of the Worldwide Malaria Situation And Interventionsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Manufacturers have claimed this repels biting insects, and audible sound generators have been sold for more than three decades as mosquito repellers. However, independent studies have failed to show the efficacy of these electronic devices that emit ultrasonic waves for protection against the bites of selected species of mosquitoes (Andrade & Bueno 2001; Belton 1981; Foster & Lutes 1985; Kutz 1974). Clements (1999) pointed out that female mosquitoes did not respond to acoustic stimuli.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%