2017
DOI: 10.3390/plants6010011
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Abstract: The ethnopharmacology, chemistry and pharmacology of four Malian medicinal plants, Biophytum umbraculum, Burkea africana, Lannea velutina and Terminalia macroptera are reviewed. These plants are used by traditional healers against numerous ailments: malaria, gastrointestinal diseases, wounds, sexually transmitted diseases, insect bites and snake bites, etc. The scientific evidence for these uses is, however, limited. From the chemical and pharmacological evidence presented here, it seems possible that the use … Show more

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Cited by 27 publications
(28 citation statements)
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“…Medicinal plants represent a significant source of therapeutic remedies, being also the basis of traditional or indigenous healing systems, still widely used by the majority of populations in many countries [ 1 , 2 ]. Recently, the ethnopharmacological potentials of these plant matrices have received important consideration by both scientists and the pharmaceutical industry towards complementing or even replacing conventional pharmacotherapies [ 2 , 3 , 4 , 5 , 6 , 7 , 8 , 9 , 10 , 11 ]. Moreover, many of these plants have also been highlighted for their added-food value ability, providing a dual role, i.e., food flavor and bioactive compounds [ 3 , 12 , 13 , 14 , 15 , 16 , 17 , 18 , 19 ].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Medicinal plants represent a significant source of therapeutic remedies, being also the basis of traditional or indigenous healing systems, still widely used by the majority of populations in many countries [ 1 , 2 ]. Recently, the ethnopharmacological potentials of these plant matrices have received important consideration by both scientists and the pharmaceutical industry towards complementing or even replacing conventional pharmacotherapies [ 2 , 3 , 4 , 5 , 6 , 7 , 8 , 9 , 10 , 11 ]. Moreover, many of these plants have also been highlighted for their added-food value ability, providing a dual role, i.e., food flavor and bioactive compounds [ 3 , 12 , 13 , 14 , 15 , 16 , 17 , 18 , 19 ].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Terminalia chevalieri , Myrobalanus macroptera ) widespread in West Africa from Senegal to Cameroon [ 8 ]. In Mali, T. macroptera is one of the most cited plant used in traditional medicine to treat a large variety of diseases including malaria [ 9 ]. In addition, traditional remedies allow an affordable access to anti-malarial drugs for the most deprived [ 10 13 ].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Medicinal plants studied are important for the evaluation of antimicrobial, antifungal, and antiviral activity in infectious diseases. Therefore, various medicinal plants may produce effects through more than one specific mechanism [111][112][113][114]. The results of…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%