2009
DOI: 10.1590/s0100-69912009000500007
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Abstract: In esophagectomy for esophagus cancer, cervical esophagogastric anastomosis with invagination presented a lower rate of esophagogastric fistula versus anastomosis without invagination. Stenosis rates in esophagogastric anastomosis proved similar in both approach with or without invagination.

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Cited by 3 publications
(71 citation statements)
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References 32 publications
(71 reference statements)
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“…Multiple attempt techniques are listed in domestic and foreign literature, with no solution of the matter, since when they reduce the rate of fistulas they do not handle stenosis or vice versa 1,2,[5][6][7][8] . The laparoscopic approach did not alter the rate of fistulas when compared with open access 9 .…”
Section: Technique Technique Technique Technique Techniquementioning
confidence: 99%
“…Multiple attempt techniques are listed in domestic and foreign literature, with no solution of the matter, since when they reduce the rate of fistulas they do not handle stenosis or vice versa 1,2,[5][6][7][8] . The laparoscopic approach did not alter the rate of fistulas when compared with open access 9 .…”
Section: Technique Technique Technique Technique Techniquementioning
confidence: 99%
“…Anastomotic stricture occurs in 5 to 46% of operated cases and can manifest up to a year after surgery. 8 …”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%