2010
DOI: 10.1016/j.colsurfa.2010.01.052
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Equilibrium and dynamic surface properties of trisiloxane aqueous solutions. Part 2. Theory and comparison with experiment

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Cited by 15 publications
(9 citation statements)
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“…Ramón has published more than 200 papers in the area of liquid interfaces, surface rheology, surfactants and polymer-surfactant complexes in bulk and at interfaces, among others. We have co-authored several papers on these subjects [ [1] , [2] , [3] , [4] , [5] , [6] , [7] , [8] , [9] , [10] , [11] , [12] , [13] , [14] , [15] ]. Thus, when I was invited to write this article, I thought first to write about one of those subjects, in the line of our joint work.…”
Section: Forewordmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Ramón has published more than 200 papers in the area of liquid interfaces, surface rheology, surfactants and polymer-surfactant complexes in bulk and at interfaces, among others. We have co-authored several papers on these subjects [ [1] , [2] , [3] , [4] , [5] , [6] , [7] , [8] , [9] , [10] , [11] , [12] , [13] , [14] , [15] ]. Thus, when I was invited to write this article, I thought first to write about one of those subjects, in the line of our joint work.…”
Section: Forewordmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…It is again not clear, however, how this adsorption mechanism would proceed. It is suggested that this adsorption works via the formation of a bilayer that advances the droplet at the leading edge, an idea also supported by Ruckenstein in ref 11. In ref 12, it is argued that the rapid spreading of trisiloxane surfactants is related to the formation of surfactant aggregates at the interfaces. Thus, while there are various competing hypotheses on superspreading, there are still two main open questions: what is the mechanism for superspreading, and which properties of trisiloxane surfactants facilitate this phenomenon?…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…This behaviour may bear connection with the superspreading of trisiloxane surfactants. All studied surfactants form clusters at the interfaces, which may suggest that the aggregation propensity of surfactants may not be related to superspreading as has been previously suggested [115]. It cannot be discounted that aggregation formation may be important as the simulations were not sufficient to analyse possible differences between aggregates [21].…”
Section: All-atom Modelsmentioning
confidence: 74%
“…By studying the chain length of the surfactant, it was revealed that in the case of a long surfactant the hydrophilic parts overlap and repel each other due to the curvature of the interfaces (e.g., LV surface), which may cause the aggregates to break up at the interface due to the energy penalty that stems from the above repulsive interactions. When surfactant is short, aggregates cannot form, as has been also discussed in experiment [115], which makes surfactants with intermediate length ideal candidates for the smooth transition effect at the contact line [22]. Hydrophilic substrates render the adsorption of surfactant on the substrate unfavourable, while hydrophobic substrates favour the fast adsorption of the surfactant through the contact line [22].…”
Section: All-atom Modelsmentioning
confidence: 83%