1995
DOI: 10.1590/s0004-282x1995000200011
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Epilepsy with continuous spike-waves during slow wave sleep: a clinical and electroencephalographic study

Abstract: SUMMARY -We report four children with epilepsy with "continuous spike-waves during slow wave sleep" (CSWSS). The main clinical features were partial motor seizures, mental retardation and motor deficit. The EEG findings were characterized by nearly continuous (>85%) diffuse slow spike and wave activity in two patients, and localized to one hemisphere in two other cases during non-REM sleep. The treatment was effective in improving the clinical seizures, but not the EEG pattern. We believe that this epileptic s… Show more

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Cited by 2 publications
(2 citation statements)
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“…Indeed, epileptiform discharges can still be present after the patient achieves seizure freedom. Similar results were reported by Silva et al [167], who demonstrated that in spite of improvement in seizure control, abnormal EEG activity in patients with CSWS syndrome was still preserved.…”
Section: Eeg and Ieegsupporting
confidence: 90%
“…Indeed, epileptiform discharges can still be present after the patient achieves seizure freedom. Similar results were reported by Silva et al [167], who demonstrated that in spite of improvement in seizure control, abnormal EEG activity in patients with CSWS syndrome was still preserved.…”
Section: Eeg and Ieegsupporting
confidence: 90%
“…Em torno dos 12 anos de idade este padrão eletrográfico desaparece26. 27 Epilepsia parcial atípica benigna da infância Geralmente confundida com a síndrome de Lennox-Gastaut, a epilepsia parcial atípica benigna da InFancia28 ocorre em crianças a partir dos 2 anos de idade, com crises atônicas, mioclônicas (responsáveis por várias quedas dos pacientes), ausências atípicas, parciais motoras com convulsões generalizadas (durante o sono), muito freqüentes, diárias, resistentes ao tratamento (por isso, evitar excesso de drogas) e desaparecendo entre 8 e 10 anos de idade, sem qualquer sequela mental ou motora. 0 exame neurológico sempre normal, durante toda a evolução.…”
Section: Epilepsia Com Ponta-onda Continua Do Sono Não Remunclassified