2017
DOI: 10.1590/0037-8682-0494-2017
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Epidemiological profile of patients co-infected with visceral leishmaniasis and HIV/AIDS in Northeast, Brazil

Abstract: Introduction: Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) and human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/ AIDS) co-infection has been a research topic of interest worldwide. In Brazil, it has been observed that there is a relative underreporting and failure in the understanding and management of this important association. The aim of this study was to analyze epidemiological and clinical aspects of patients with VL with and without HIV/AIDS. Methods: We conducted an observational and analytical study… Show more

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Cited by 12 publications
(8 citation statements)
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“…With the presence of HIV, the risk of coinfection increases from 100 to 2320 times. In endemic countries, the rate is between 2 and 9%, but in neglected populations, this rate may be even higher if it is not on the list of opportunistic diseases associated with HIV (Viana et al ., 2017).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…With the presence of HIV, the risk of coinfection increases from 100 to 2320 times. In endemic countries, the rate is between 2 and 9%, but in neglected populations, this rate may be even higher if it is not on the list of opportunistic diseases associated with HIV (Viana et al ., 2017).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…With the presence of HIV, the risk of coinfection increases from 100 to 2320 times. In endemic countries, the rate is between 2 and 9%, but in neglected populations, this rate may be even higher if it is not on the list of opportunistic diseases associated with HIV (Viana et al, 2017). Geographical overlap of HVL and the HIV, the consequent emergence of coinfection of these diseases, has become a public health problem with high morbidity and mortality rates (Alvar et al, 2008;Martins-Melo et al, 2014).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Many Brazilian studies have reported the presence of splenomegaly followed by fever, weight loss, and asthenia. Nonetheless, in 81 patients with VL/HIV coinfection in Ceará [30] and in another study that identified weight loss, weakness, fever, and hepatosplenomegaly as the most common physical changes in 65 patients with VL/HIV coinfection [31], the most common symptoms were skin pallor, hepatomegaly, and splenomegaly, followed by weight loss and fever. These findings emphasize a low proportion of patients with splenomegaly (57.9%) when compared to patients with VL without HIV (84.9%), which is different from what was observed by Sousa-Gomes et al .…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…In their study, fever was 250 observed more frequently in patients with VL than those with VL/HIV co-infection, [23,28]. Different 254 from many Brazilian studies, which reported the presence of splenomegaly followed by 255 fever, weight loss, and asthenia, in 81 patients with VL/HIV co-infection in Ceará [29] 256 and another study that identified weight loss, weakness, fever, and hepatosplenomegaly 257 as the most common physical changes in 65 patients with VL/HIV co-infection [13], the 258 most common symptoms in this study were skin pallor, hepatomegaly, and levels observed in some patients with VL/HIV co-infection [33,34,35] was also found in 279 the present study. However, we should note that such an increase was higher in patients 280 with VL alone, as additionally reported by De Souza et al and Cota et al [25,36].…”
mentioning
confidence: 88%