2011
DOI: 10.1590/s0102-33062011000200013
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Abstract: Environmental degradation impact on native communities of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in an urban fragment of semideciduous plateau forest RESUMO (Impacto da degradação ambiental sobre as comunidades nativas de fungos micorrízicos arbusculares em um fragmento urbano de fl oresta estacional semidecídua ABSTRACT(Environmental degradation impact on native communities of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in an urban fragment of semideciduous plateau forest). Three forest reserves, with highly degraded areas, are open… Show more

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Cited by 6 publications
(3 citation statements)
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References 20 publications
(22 reference statements)
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“…Mycorrhizal colonization rates measured in these areas and plants were comparable to data from others, as reported in Table 2. Human influence in the environment tends to reduce mycorrhizal establishment, colonization and diversity worldwide (Grilli et al, 2014) and specifically in Brazil (Carrenho & Gomes-Da-Costa, 2011). In this study, although intuitively one could think that the removal of approximately nine meters of topsoil in the degraded area could have eliminated potential root colonizers fungi spores from the soil system, plants living in degraded showed a higher AMF colonization than the ones living in more natural, pristine, non-degraded areas.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 66%
“…Mycorrhizal colonization rates measured in these areas and plants were comparable to data from others, as reported in Table 2. Human influence in the environment tends to reduce mycorrhizal establishment, colonization and diversity worldwide (Grilli et al, 2014) and specifically in Brazil (Carrenho & Gomes-Da-Costa, 2011). In this study, although intuitively one could think that the removal of approximately nine meters of topsoil in the degraded area could have eliminated potential root colonizers fungi spores from the soil system, plants living in degraded showed a higher AMF colonization than the ones living in more natural, pristine, non-degraded areas.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 66%
“…It is notable that one subspecies appeared to show highest abundance in the rural and urban areas, whilst the other showed its highest abundance in sites of intermediate urbanity. Interestingly, this species has previously been described as both sensitive (Oehl et al, 2010;Carrenho and Gomes-da-Costa, 2011) and resilient (Sousa et al, 2013) to disturbance. Our observations reaffirm the importance of asking questions about the correct taxonomic resolution for studies such as this (Roy et al, 2019), and provides strong support for van der Heijden et al's (2004) suggestion that inferring traits based on taxonomy alone, particularly at the species level, is problematic.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 86%
“…Of these, five morphospecies (Acaulospora mellea, Glomus tortuosum, Glomus macrocarpum, Glomus clavisporum, Glomus microaggregatum) were common to both areas (Table 2). The Sørensen index (0.58) revealed an intermediate similarity (<61.5%) (Carrenho & Gomes-da-Costa, 2011) between Table 1. Soil physical and chemical properties, total organic carbon (TOC), gravimetric moisture content (W g ), and temperature (T) in the 0-5 cm depth layer in pasture and analog forestry sites in Seropédica, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 92%