2007
DOI: 10.1590/s1676-06032007000200019
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Abstract: Microsatellite markers were used to characterize the genetic diversity within and among seven natural populations of Oryza glumaepaula. Six of these populations originated from the hydrographic basin of the Amazon and one from Rio Paraguay in the Pantanal Matogrossense. Using seven microsatellite loci, the following intrapopulation genetic diversity parameters were estimated on average: 1.98 alleles per locus, 56.2% polymorphic loci, H o = 0.026 and H e = 0.241. High interpopulational differentiation was notic… Show more

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Cited by 5 publications
(6 citation statements)
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“…A lower F ST value (0.491) was obtained by Karasawa et al (2007) with microsatellite markers for O. glumaepatula populations, although similar values were obtained by Brondani et al (2005) (F ST = 0.847) and Silva et al (2007) (F ST = 0.715). The fact that most of the isozymic variability was distributed between rather than within species is in accordance with the predominantly autogamic mating system of these species, especially the diploid O. glumaepatula (Akimoto et al, 1998;Buso et al, 1998;Brondani et al, 2005;Karasawa et al, 2007a,b;Vaz et al, 2009).…”
Section: Resultssupporting
confidence: 54%
“…A lower F ST value (0.491) was obtained by Karasawa et al (2007) with microsatellite markers for O. glumaepatula populations, although similar values were obtained by Brondani et al (2005) (F ST = 0.847) and Silva et al (2007) (F ST = 0.715). The fact that most of the isozymic variability was distributed between rather than within species is in accordance with the predominantly autogamic mating system of these species, especially the diploid O. glumaepatula (Akimoto et al, 1998;Buso et al, 1998;Brondani et al, 2005;Karasawa et al, 2007a,b;Vaz et al, 2009).…”
Section: Resultssupporting
confidence: 54%
“…However, the authors observed greater intrapopulational than interpopulational variability, a pattern usually found in the crossfertilized populations, which was explained considering the life history characteristics of this species. Studies of the genetic structure of O. glumaepatula populations were also recently conducted with microsatellite markers (Karasawa, 2005;Karasawa et al, 2007;Brondani et al, 2005;Silva et al, 2007), showing high values for F ST and R ST , suggesting a higher interpopulational variability, as well as the predominance of a selffertilizing breeding system. The purpose of this study, using isozymic markers, was to provide further information on the genetic diversity and genetic structure of 14 O. glumaepatula populations, originated from the hydrographic basins of the Amazon and of Rio Paraguay in the Pantanal ecosystem.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Microsatellites are considered genetically more informative than other markers, especially when dealing with populations with low genetic diversity content at the DNA level (Paetkau et al 1995). The low gene diversity (H e ) levels in this species has already been shown in previous studies with isozymes, revealing variations from 0.044 to 0.060 (Akimoto et al 1998, Buso et al 1998, Veasey et al 2008, as compared with microsatellites with higher levels, ranging from 0.113 to 0.491 (Brondani et al 2005, Karasawa et al 2007a, Silva et al 2007. Thus, considering the information obtained in this study with isozymes and microsatellites, we can conclude that microsatellite markers are in fact more informative as they were able to detect higher levels of intra-population diversity in this species.…”
Section: Genetic Diversity Levelsmentioning
confidence: 70%
“…Previous studies on genetic structure conducted in the genus Oryza have recorded several F ST (G ST ) values, but largely agree that the mode of reproduction of the species has generated prominent effect on the differentiation observed. In O. glumaepatula, studies using allozymes showed F ST values of 0.346 (Akimoto et al 1998), 0.310 (Buso et al 1998) and 0.763 (Veasey et al 2008), while those using microsatellites showed values such as 0.847 (Brondani et al 2005), 0.491 (Karasawa et al 2007a and 0.715 (Silva et al 2007). In progeny studies, the value recorded with microsatellites was 0.451 for the parental populations, and 0.284 for the families of these populations (Karasawa et al 2007b).…”
Section: Genetic Diversity Levelsmentioning
confidence: 96%
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