2021
DOI: 10.5187/jast.2021.e77
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Effects of stocking density and dietary vitamin C on performance, meat quality, intestinal permeability, and stress indicators in broiler chickens

Abstract: Competing interestsNo potential conflict of interest relevant to this article was reported. Funding sourcesState funding sources (grants, funding sources, equipment, and supplies). Include name and number of grant if available.

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Cited by 17 publications
(14 citation statements)
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“…Compared to low SD-raised chickens, high SD-raised chickens showed a decrease in body weight gain and feed intake in the starter and whole phases and increased FCR in the finisher phase [ 26 ]. The current findings are similar to those of Yu et al [ 27 ] and Goo et al [ 28 ], who found that broilers reared at high SD spaces (18 birds/m 2 ) had lower live body weight, body weight gain, and feed consumption, as well as impaired intestinal barrier function, without affecting meat quality or anti-oxidant conditions in the liver. In terms of muscle quality, the high SD group had significantly lighter breast muscles 45 min and 24 h after slaughter [ 29 ].…”
Section: Resultssupporting
confidence: 92%
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“…Compared to low SD-raised chickens, high SD-raised chickens showed a decrease in body weight gain and feed intake in the starter and whole phases and increased FCR in the finisher phase [ 26 ]. The current findings are similar to those of Yu et al [ 27 ] and Goo et al [ 28 ], who found that broilers reared at high SD spaces (18 birds/m 2 ) had lower live body weight, body weight gain, and feed consumption, as well as impaired intestinal barrier function, without affecting meat quality or anti-oxidant conditions in the liver. In terms of muscle quality, the high SD group had significantly lighter breast muscles 45 min and 24 h after slaughter [ 29 ].…”
Section: Resultssupporting
confidence: 92%
“…Plasma corticosterone, serum glucose, cholesterol, total nitrites, and the heterophil/lymphocyte ratio were unaffected [ 6 ]. Another study found that broilers raised on higher SD had higher blood heterophil lymphocyte ratios (H: L) and corticosterone levels [ 29 , 27 ]. The PCV values were reduced, and serum AST concentrations were increased significantly ( p < 0.05) by the increased rate of SD [ 17 ].…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Jahanian and Mirfendereski (2015) found that 500 mg/kg vitamin C supplementation had no significant effect on the growth performance of broiler chickens subjected to high SD but decreased plasma and yolk MDA. A recent study by Yu et al (2021) observed that 200 mg/kg had no marked effects on the growth performance, meat quality, and intestinal permeability of broiler chickens stocked at high density (12 birds/m 2 ). Shewita et al (2019) reported that 200 mg/kg vitamin C improved final body weight, feed intake and decreased mortality in broilers reared in high SD (15 birds/m 2 ).…”
Section: Vitamin Cmentioning
confidence: 95%
“…Shewita et al (2019) reported that 200 mg/kg vitamin C improved final body weight, feed intake and decreased mortality in broilers reared in high SD (15 birds/m 2 ). The inconsistency in the findings might be attributed to the strain of the animal or different SD used (Yu et al, 2021). Vitamin C was also reported to decrease plasma corticosterone caused by high SD in broilers (Mirfendereski and Jahanian, 2015).…”
Section: Vitamin Cmentioning
confidence: 97%
“…The H:L ratio in the blood was analyzed according to the method of Lentfer et al., 2015 with a minor modification. The detailed procedure has been reported in the previous experiment ( Yu et al, 2021 ).…”
Section: Methodsmentioning
confidence: 99%