2017
DOI: 10.1136/esmoopen-2017-000271
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Effects of physical activity on depressive symptoms during breast cancer survivorship: a meta-analysis of randomised control trials

Abstract: BackgroundBreast cancer is one of the most common cancers affecting women worldwide, and depressive symptoms are disturbing side effects of cancer diagnosis and treatment. Physical activity and exercise have emerged as an alternative treatment in handling psychological distress throughout breast cancer survivorship.AimThe aim of this review was to present the results of (1) physical activity and (2) exercise interventions in terms of type and duration regarding depressive symptoms among breast cancer survivors… Show more

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Cited by 56 publications
(72 citation statements)
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“…Remarkable improvements in patient-reported outcomes were observed for quality of life, fatigue, and depressive symptoms. While our results align with those reported in the literature [ 15 , 16 ], the exercise-induced reductions in fatigue (effect size d = 0.91) and depressive symptomology (effect size d = 0.97) are unparalleled with substantially larger effect sizes than the 0.30 and 0.38 reported from recent meta-analyses examining exercise and fatigue [ 16 ] and depressive symptoms [ 17 ], respectively, in cancer survivors. The marked reduction in these two domains may be due to the inclusion of women within a short period (6 months) of concluding cancer-related treatment, the physically inactive and obese nature of the participants upon enrollment, and the ethnically diverse sample.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 90%
“…Remarkable improvements in patient-reported outcomes were observed for quality of life, fatigue, and depressive symptoms. While our results align with those reported in the literature [ 15 , 16 ], the exercise-induced reductions in fatigue (effect size d = 0.91) and depressive symptomology (effect size d = 0.97) are unparalleled with substantially larger effect sizes than the 0.30 and 0.38 reported from recent meta-analyses examining exercise and fatigue [ 16 ] and depressive symptoms [ 17 ], respectively, in cancer survivors. The marked reduction in these two domains may be due to the inclusion of women within a short period (6 months) of concluding cancer-related treatment, the physically inactive and obese nature of the participants upon enrollment, and the ethnically diverse sample.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 90%
“…Performing specific forms of regular exercise and maintaining an active lifestyle can play an important role in survivorship, 15 since they help survivors to increase survival rates and decrease the risk of cancer recurrence. 16 Major health organizations recommend that cancer survivors should perform at least 150 minutes of moderate or 75 minutes of high-intensity aerobic exercise combined with a minimum of two strengthening exercise sessions on a weekly basis.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Care and drug therapies for alleviating these physical symptoms should be provided in the long term as required. Patients should be encouraged to engage in more physical activity [ 49 ]. Depression is closely related to QOL and it has been reported that depression interventions including psychoeducational interventions improve QOL [ 19 , 50 ].…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%