2016
DOI: 10.1590/1678-4324-2016160504
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Abstract: Effects of leached amylose (AM) and amylopectin (AP) on textural and morphological properties of cooked

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Cited by 19 publications
(16 citation statements)
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References 29 publications
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“…A similar phenomenon could be applied to the leached short‐chain amylopectin during cooking, mentioned above. Leached amylopectin during cooking is believed to accumulate as a viscous coated layer to the outer surface of cooked rice, leading to increased adhesiveness (Yang et al, ). Meanwhile, this phenomenon could not be found in high‐amylose food materials (Syafutri, Pratama, Syaiful, & Faizal, ), which explains why waxy rice, such as cooked purple rice, demonstrated significantly higher adhesiveness than cooked nonwaxy rice (black and red rice), and the variation in the value between the microwave method and steaming method.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The optimal temperature in both methods ranges from 79-84 o C. If cooking is done above that temperature, there will be decrease in physical quality of amylose and amylopectin in rice (Yang et al, 2016). This aff ects ratio of amylose and amylopectin which will then aff ect texture and hardness of rice after cooking (Patindol et al, 2010).…”
Section: Cooking Propertiesmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Rice is one of the major cereals throughout the world and is consumed daily in the traditional Asian diet (Yang et al, ). Rice is commonly consumed as a whole grain after cooking in boiling water (Okabe, ).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Stickiness of cooked rice is influenced by several factors, such as variety, degree of milling (Saleh & Meullenet, ), and moisture content (Kim et al, ; Ogawa, Wood, Whitehand, Orts, & Gleen, ), as well as amylose/amylopectin ratio (Juliano, ; Juliano, Onate, & Del Mundo, ; Takeda, Hizukuri, & Juliano, ), and protein and lipid contents (Okadome, Toyoshima, Shimizu, Akinaga, & Ohtsubo, ). Environmental conditions also influence rice stickiness, such as storage after harvest (Meullenet, Champagne, Bett, McClung, & Kauffmann, ), cooking (Yang et al, ), cultivation climate (Okamoto & Horino, ), and genetic properties (Kobayashi & Tomita, ; Kobayashi, Tomita, Yu, Takeuchi, & Yano, ; Takeuchi et al, ).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Amylose and amylopectin detected the most important content that affected the texture of cooked rice. The higher the amylopectin content, it is more stickiness [2][3][4]. Japonica cooked rice is the highest amylopectin content so that its texture is stick and glossy.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%