2016
DOI: 10.1590/1806-9061-2015-0136
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Abstract: The objective of the present study was to determine the effects of the gradual dilution of broiler finisher diets with inert or less nutritive materials on growth performance, feed cost, and meat organoleptic properties. Broiler chicks (n=147) were allocated into 49 pens and fed a mash broiler finisher diet (control) or the control diet diluted either with cassava leaf meal (CLM), gliricidia leaf meal (GLM), grass meal (GM), rice bran (RB), sand (SND), or sawdust (SD). For a given diluent, six diets were prepa… Show more

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Cited by 4 publications
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“…This decrease is independent of the inclusion of dietary sand levels in the diet. Sand level in broilers and laying hens diets up to 10% did not adversely affect performance (Sahraei and Shariatmad 2007;van der Meulen et al 2008;Atapattu and Silva 2016). Sand can improve the digestibility of nutrients due to improving grinding and mechanical digestion of coarse components in the gizzard and increasing the surface exposed to enzymes in the small intestinal (Sahraei and Shariatmad 2007;van der Meulen et al 2008;Atapattu and Silva 2016).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…This decrease is independent of the inclusion of dietary sand levels in the diet. Sand level in broilers and laying hens diets up to 10% did not adversely affect performance (Sahraei and Shariatmad 2007;van der Meulen et al 2008;Atapattu and Silva 2016). Sand can improve the digestibility of nutrients due to improving grinding and mechanical digestion of coarse components in the gizzard and increasing the surface exposed to enzymes in the small intestinal (Sahraei and Shariatmad 2007;van der Meulen et al 2008;Atapattu and Silva 2016).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%