2019
DOI: 10.1093/jas/skz206
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Effect of tannin-containing hays on enteric methane emissions and nitrogen partitioning in beef cattle1

Abstract: The objective of this study was to determine whether feeding tannin-containing hays to heifers and mature beef cows influences enteric methane (CH4) emissions and nitrogen (N) excretion relative to feeding traditional legume and grass hays. Fifteen mature beef cows (Exp. 1) and 9 yearling heifers (Exp. 2) were each randomly assigned to treatment groups in an incomplete bock design with 2 periods and 6 types of hays with 3 hays fed each period (n = 5 cows and 3 heifers per treatment). Groups were fed tannin-con… Show more

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Cited by 54 publications
(50 citation statements)
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References 61 publications
(66 reference statements)
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“…This effect was also observed when cattle were fed condensed tannin extracts in rations ( Koenig et al, 2018 ), as the high affinity of condensed tannins for binding protein reduces ruminal protein degradation and urinary N excretion. The same pattern of reduced urinary N excretion was observed in cows and heifers consuming tannin-containing hays (SF and BFT; Stewart, 2018 ), suggesting that condensed tannins remained active in the hay to bind with proteins in the rumen. Previous studies reported that condensed tannins are labile molecules, inactivated in response to the environmental conditions of the haying process ( Makkar and Singh, 1991 ).…”
Section: Chemical Diversity and Ecosystem Servicesmentioning
confidence: 55%
“…This effect was also observed when cattle were fed condensed tannin extracts in rations ( Koenig et al, 2018 ), as the high affinity of condensed tannins for binding protein reduces ruminal protein degradation and urinary N excretion. The same pattern of reduced urinary N excretion was observed in cows and heifers consuming tannin-containing hays (SF and BFT; Stewart, 2018 ), suggesting that condensed tannins remained active in the hay to bind with proteins in the rumen. Previous studies reported that condensed tannins are labile molecules, inactivated in response to the environmental conditions of the haying process ( Makkar and Singh, 1991 ).…”
Section: Chemical Diversity and Ecosystem Servicesmentioning
confidence: 55%
“…More OM remained undigested in NDF isolates from tanniferous species that retained tannins in the NDF fraction. The HT in SMB bound more dietary N than the CT in BFT or SNF when beef cows were fed tannin‐containing hays as their complete diet 16 . Here, the NDF of SMB, with half the whole‐plant concentration of HT, had the greatest undigested OM.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 91%
“…The objective of this study was to compare the rate and extent of digestion of two non‐tannin (ALF and CMV) and two CT‐containing (BFT and SNF) legumes with a grass, meadow brome (MBG), and a non‐legume forb, small burnet (SMB), when these forages were grown under irrigation in the Mountain West region. Grasses have more fiber and less lignin than legumes, 5 and the non‐legume forb SMB is persistent and palatable to livestock but contains a hydrolysable tannin (HT) that reduces nitrogen excretion in the urine of beef cattle 16 . The in vitro gas production technique was used to study the influence of NDF, NFC, crude protein (CP), lignin, CT, HT, and other nutrients and secondary plant compounds on the rumen digestibility of these forages.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Brominated fatty acids are primarily synthesized by Asparagopsis [36]. Condensed tannins are suggested to reduce CH 4 production, as demonstrated in a Canadian experiment with beef cattle [37]. In Table 2, the content of condensed tannins is reported, and it shows small differences between the diets.…”
Section: In Vivomentioning
confidence: 96%