2006
DOI: 10.1186/1471-2210-6-4
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Abstract: BackgroundInsulin is the drug of choice in the management of diabetes mellitus (DM). About 76 % of diabetic patients suffer from gastrointestinal (GI) disorders. Therapy of DM with insulin primarily involves lowering of elevated blood glucose levels. Hence, on any organ in addition to insulin's effect, hypoglycaemic effect also prevails. A systematic study exploring the effect of insulin on small intestinal transit in normal laboratory animals is lacking. Hence, in the present study, the possible effect of ins… Show more

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Cited by 8 publications
(2 citation statements)
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References 18 publications
(17 reference statements)
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“…Such host-range expansions will often increase the geographic distribution of the infesting insect, and in the event of extinction and/or removal of the alternative host(s) it may be a first step in speciation (e.g. Janz et al 2006). Two major insights emerged from this study.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 98%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…Such host-range expansions will often increase the geographic distribution of the infesting insect, and in the event of extinction and/or removal of the alternative host(s) it may be a first step in speciation (e.g. Janz et al 2006). Two major insights emerged from this study.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 98%
“…Speciation via host-range expansion and host shift are not mutually exclusive. Host-range expansions may increase the geographic range of phytophagous insects, which may, following fragmentation, specialise on different plants in isolation (Päivinen et al 2005;Janz et al 2006). The geographic distribution of interaction can therefore be used to generate hypotheses about modes of specialisation (Thompson 1994).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%