2020
DOI: 10.1029/2020gl087862
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Divergence of Sediment Fluxes Triggered by Sea‐Level Rise Will Reshape Coastal Bays

Abstract: Sediment budget and sediment availability are direct metrics for evaluating the resilience of coastal bays to sea‐level rise (SLR). Here we use a high‐resolution numerical model of a tidally dominated marsh‐lagoon system to explore feedbacks between SLR and sediment dynamics. SLR augments tidal prism and inundation depth, facilitating sediment deposition on the marsh platform. At the same time, our results indicate that SLR enhances ebb‐dominated currents and increases sediment resuspension, reducing the sedim… Show more

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Cited by 14 publications
(8 citation statements)
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“…SLR is likely to accelerate in the coming century, adding another 0.28–1.01 m till 2100 (Chen et al., 2017; IPCC, 2021). A worldwide concern is that accretion of coastal tidal flats (mainly the intertidal zones) and salt marshes may not be able to keep pace with an accelerating SLR rate (Best et al., 2018; Zhang et al., 2020), resulting in coastal erosion and shoreline retreat, drowning of salt marshes and habitats, and increased flood risk (Craft et al., 2009; Kirwan & Megonigal, 2013; Lovelock et al., 2015; Valiela et al., 2018). Land subsidence and a decline in river‐borne sediment supply may further exacerbate coastal erosion and wetland losses (Syvitski et al., 2009).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…SLR is likely to accelerate in the coming century, adding another 0.28–1.01 m till 2100 (Chen et al., 2017; IPCC, 2021). A worldwide concern is that accretion of coastal tidal flats (mainly the intertidal zones) and salt marshes may not be able to keep pace with an accelerating SLR rate (Best et al., 2018; Zhang et al., 2020), resulting in coastal erosion and shoreline retreat, drowning of salt marshes and habitats, and increased flood risk (Craft et al., 2009; Kirwan & Megonigal, 2013; Lovelock et al., 2015; Valiela et al., 2018). Land subsidence and a decline in river‐borne sediment supply may further exacerbate coastal erosion and wetland losses (Syvitski et al., 2009).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Coastal models are generally calibrated with few tidal or velocity gauges because of the high cost of field observations (Zhang et al., 2020). In our study domain, 18 water level stations cover not only the main channel (WLO), but also the complex creeks network, well capturing the delay in tidal propagation and the flow attenuation over the entire system.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Coastal wetlands are natural buffer zones between land and ocean that provide protection from rising seas and storm surges (Fagherazzi et al., 2012, 2020; FitzGerald & Hughes, 2019; Schuersch et al., 2018). Sediment is essential for wetlands, because it promotes accretion that counteracts sea level rise (Donatelli et al., 2018; Ganju et al., 2017; Kirwan et al., 2016; Morris et al., 2002; Zhang et al., 2020). Unfortunately, as results of sediment starvation, loss of these valuable ecosystems is increasing worldwide.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…At the same time, the beach serves as a natural barrier, a soft defense compared with human-made hard structures, to protect the coastal hinterland against flooding and extreme storm surges using wave energy dissipation (Rijn, 2009(Rijn, , 2010Slobbe et al, 2013;Stive et al, 2013). Hence, more and more concerns have been revealed on the mechanism of beach bed level changes since the twentieth century in the context of the higher frequency and greater intensity of extreme hydrological events (Vellinga, 1982;Rijn, 2011;Li et al, 2014;Masselink and Heteren, 2014;Hu et al, 2015) coupled with global sea-level rise (Nerem et al, 2018;Zhang et al, 2020), especially for low-lying coastal and island countries (Nicholls and Cazenave, 2010;Stive et al, 2013;Pucino et al, 2021).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%