2021
DOI: 10.1038/s41598-021-93379-2
| View full text |Cite
|
Sign up to set email alerts
|

Abstract: The Labrador Retriever is one of the most popular dog breeds worldwide, therefore it is important to have reliable evidence on the general health issues of the breed. Using anonymised veterinary clinical data from the VetCompass Programme, this study aimed to explore the relative risk to common disorders in the Labrador Retriever. The clinical records of a random sample of dogs were reviewed to extract the most definitive diagnoses for all disorders recorded during 2016. A list of disorders was generated, incl… Show more

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
2
2
1

Citation Types

1
9
0

Year Published

2021
2021
2023
2023

Publication Types

Select...
5

Relationship

4
1

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 7 publications
(10 citation statements)
references
References 92 publications
1
9
0
Order By: Relevance
“…The data extraction, collation and analytic methods used in this study are deliberately similar to other VetCompass studies in order to promote comparability across the study outputs [ 29 , 30 , 32 ]. The study population included all available dogs under primary veterinary care at 886 clinics participating in the VetCompass Programme during 2016.…”
Section: Methodsmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…The data extraction, collation and analytic methods used in this study are deliberately similar to other VetCompass studies in order to promote comparability across the study outputs [ 29 , 30 , 32 ]. The study population included all available dogs under primary veterinary care at 886 clinics participating in the VetCompass Programme during 2016.…”
Section: Methodsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Much of the previous research in canine health has focused on identifying disorder predispositions (i.e., increased susceptibility to certain disorders) [ 4 ]. However, it is becoming increasingly apparent that greater exploration of disorder protections (i.e., resistance to developing certain disorders) is needed because understanding why breeds do not develop certain disorders may be as, or even more, important as understanding why they do develop these disorders [ 29 , 30 ]. With this background in mind, the current study aimed to explore anonymised veterinary clinical data from the VetCompass Programme [ 31 ] to compare the odds of common disorders between Pugs and all remaining dogs under primary veterinary care in the UK during 2016 after accounting for major confounding variables.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Consequently, the study combined inference based on a series of metrics. One such metric was the proportion of disorders that differed between the two breed groups, followed by a deeper comparison of the counts of predispositions vs. protections [ 10 , 27 ]. The extent of the differences in odds ratios for these predispositions and protections was also considered.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…For breeds where many of these health deviations are related to conformational features, this would provide some evidence that these health deviations are unfortunately associated with extremes of conformation. A previous exploration of predispositions and protections in dogs reported that Labrador Retrievers differed to other dogs in 19/35 (54.3 %) of common disorders, showing predispositions in 12/35 (34.3 %) and protections in 7/35 (20.0 %) [ 10 ]. A study using a similar design reported that Staffordshire Bull Terriers differed to other dogs in 9/36 (25.0 %) of common disorders, showing predispositions in 4/36 (11.1 %) and protections in 5/36 (13.9 %) [ 27 ].…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation