1995
DOI: 10.1016/0735-1097(95)00377-0 View full text |Buy / Rent full text
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Abstract: During the long-term follow-up of the Japanese form of apical hypertrophy, giant negative T waves disappeared in association with decreases in R wave amplitude in lead V5, indicating that these ECG hallmarks are clinical features that evolve progressively during the natural course of the disease.

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“…There has been some controversy, and confusion, regarding the apical phenotype of HCM, in which hypertrophy of the myocardium predominantly involves the apex of the LV, because of the different diagnostic modalities used by investigators and the various morphologic presentations of apical hypertrophy. [6][7][8][9][10][11][12][18][19][20][21][22][23][24] Even in the apical phenotype, there are several morphologic variations and terms, including the Japanese form, Western form, apical ASH, pure apical HCM, and mixed apical HCM. 6,8,[10][11][12][13] Although those variations may have different clinical characteristics, in daily clinical practice they are still confused as "just apical hypertrophy".…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
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rupbmjkragerfmgwileyiopcupepmcmbcthiemesagefrontiersapsiucrarxivemeralduhksmucshluniversity-of-gavle
“…There has been some controversy, and confusion, regarding the apical phenotype of HCM, in which hypertrophy of the myocardium predominantly involves the apex of the LV, because of the different diagnostic modalities used by investigators and the various morphologic presentations of apical hypertrophy. [6][7][8][9][10][11][12][18][19][20][21][22][23][24] Even in the apical phenotype, there are several morphologic variations and terms, including the Japanese form, Western form, apical ASH, pure apical HCM, and mixed apical HCM. 6,8,[10][11][12][13] Although those variations may have different clinical characteristics, in daily clinical practice they are still confused as "just apical hypertrophy".…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
“…There was no association between GNT and the degree of apical wall thickness, type of AHCM, or morbidity. GNT patterns can disappear, 17 and other diseases can also present GNT in ECG, such as raised intracranial pressure, severe myocardial ischemia, and post-tachycardia syndrome, 18 therefore GNT is not the specificity feature of AHCM. Although the mechanism of GNT in AHCM patients remains uncertain, several possibilities have been suggested, including reversal of the sequence of repolarization secondary to severe hypertrophy, myocardial ischemia, and greater metabolic demands due to a more hyperdynamic left ventricle.…”
Section: Clinical Presentationmentioning
“…25 More recently, giant negative T waves have been shown to resolve during long-term follow-up. 26 Typically, apical HCM has been observed in older males, often in association with systemic hypertension, without apparent genetic transmission. 27 In the present study, 4 of the 6 patients with apical hypertrophy were female, and a history of mild hypertension was present in only 2.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning