2012
DOI: 10.1080/00343404.2011.552493
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Dimensions of Proximity and Knowledge Bases: Innovation between Spatial and Non-spatial Factors

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Cited by 219 publications
(235 citation statements)
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References 87 publications
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“…These different proximity dimensions are expected to exert complementary and reinforcing effects on knowledge transmission (Mattes, 2011). This approach is also in line with recent applied spatial econometric contributions which have emphasized the "economic" content of the distance concept.…”
Section: Introductionsupporting
confidence: 68%
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“…These different proximity dimensions are expected to exert complementary and reinforcing effects on knowledge transmission (Mattes, 2011). This approach is also in line with recent applied spatial econometric contributions which have emphasized the "economic" content of the distance concept.…”
Section: Introductionsupporting
confidence: 68%
“…Although in the previous empirical literature the attention has been mostly focused on just one kind of proximity, in particular the geographical one and to a lesser extent the technological one, with the high level of economic and institutional integration within the European production context the concurrent effect of different proximity dimensions can no longer be overlooked (Boschma 2005, Mattes 2011). As a matter of fact such an effect constitutes a crucial factor in facilitating the transmission of the existing knowledge and, in turn, in determining the creation of the new one.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The creation of knowledge that is superior to other forms is now usually considered to emerge from collective processes characterized not only by partial appropriability and shared property rights, but also by the role of the intentional effort, participation and contribution of interactive agents to access and assimilate (Antonelli 2008). Indeed, knowledge, especially 'combinatorial' knowledge, underlies the complexity of economic systems (Jensen et al 2007;Martin and Sunley 2007;Mattes 2012).…”
Section: Knowledge Dynamicsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…This knowledge requires intentional and often complex efforts to access and assimilate. Indeed, knowledge, but especially combinatorial knowledge, underlies the complexity of economic systems (Jensen et al, 2007;Martin and Sunley, 2007;Mattes, 2011).…”
Section: The Nature Of Accessed Knowledgementioning
confidence: 99%