2012
DOI: 10.1590/s1676-06032012000400027
| View full text |Cite
|
Sign up to set email alerts
|

Abstract: Abstract:In this study, we present some information of the regarding throphic niche from the anuran toad Rhinella icterica living in high altitudes above 2000 m a.s.l. from a habitat of the Atlantic Forest Biome -the Altitude Fields in the Itatiaia National Park. We found 150 prey items in toad stomachs, belonging to five prey types, as well as skin remains and some remains of plant material. The index of relative importance indicated that most important prey types were beetles and ants, these last composing 7… Show more

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
2
2

Citation Types

1
7
0

Year Published

2018
2018
2021
2021

Publication Types

Select...
8

Relationship

0
8

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 13 publications
(8 citation statements)
references
References 28 publications
(39 reference statements)
1
7
0
Order By: Relevance
“…Ants (Formicidae) also represented most of the prey volume (about 44%) and frequency (around 90%). A diet composed mainly by Formicidae is consistent with previous diet studies with adults of this and other congeneric species, which were followed by Coleoptera and Isoptera (Ferreira and Teixeira, 2009;Sabagh et al, 2012;Maia-Carneiro et al, 2013). However, in our study, Coleoptera and Isoptera were items with relatively low IRI (20.4 and 15.86, respectively).…”
supporting
confidence: 92%
“…Ants (Formicidae) also represented most of the prey volume (about 44%) and frequency (around 90%). A diet composed mainly by Formicidae is consistent with previous diet studies with adults of this and other congeneric species, which were followed by Coleoptera and Isoptera (Ferreira and Teixeira, 2009;Sabagh et al, 2012;Maia-Carneiro et al, 2013). However, in our study, Coleoptera and Isoptera were items with relatively low IRI (20.4 and 15.86, respectively).…”
supporting
confidence: 92%
“…Rhinella proboscidea fed on a variety of invertebrates, but the abundance of ants, termites, and mites as prey in the study areas as suggests that the feeding strategy was that of active foragers (Toft 1980). This pattern also was observed for other species of Rhinella, as well as in other bufonids at localities across the globe (Clarke 1974, Hirai and Matsui 2002, Isacch and Barg 2002, Quiroga et al 2009, Sabagh et al 2012, Solé et al 2017) and members of the neotropical R. margaritifera species group (Duellman 1978, Toft 1980, 1981, Parmelee 1999, Maragno and Souza 2011, Fajardo-Martínez et al 2013, Astwood-Romero et al 2016. According to Isacch and Barg (2002), bufonid species probably specialized in ant consumption because they lack teeth, which would constrain the toads to a diet of small prey.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 63%
“…According to Isacch and Barg (2002), bufonid species probably specialized in ant consumption because they lack teeth, which would constrain the toads to a diet of small prey. For many species of Rhinella, beetles are the second most frequently consumed item (Duellman 1978, Toft 1980, 1981, Parmelee 1999, Isacch and Barg 2002, Quiroga et al 2009, Maragno and Souza 2011, Sabagh et al 2012. However, in our study areas, Isoptera (Termitidae), Acari, and Araneae were also important prey items in the diet of R. proboscidea.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 65%
“…They are therefore considered to be generalists in their diet. However, prey consumption by amphibians may vary in composition and size, especially when populations live in different environments (Berazategui et al, 2007;Sabagh et al, 2012;Maia-Carneiro et al, 2013).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%