2012
DOI: 10.1111/j.1600-0706.2012.20313.x
|View full text |Cite
|
Sign up to set email alerts
|

Determinants and costs of natal dispersal in a lekking species

Abstract: Avoidance of competition and inbreeding have been invoked as the major ultimate causes of natal dispersal, but proximate factors such as sex, body condition or birth date can also be important. Natal dispersal is expected to be of particular importance to understanding the ecological and evolutionary implications of dispersal strategies, since 1) numerous evidences suggest that individual differences in dispersal strategies are expressed early in life (i.e. at the onset of dispersal movement), 2) ultimate and … Show more

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
2
1
1

Citation Types

5
56
2

Year Published

2015
2015
2024
2024

Publication Types

Select...
6

Relationship

3
3

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 31 publications
(63 citation statements)
references
References 65 publications
5
56
2
Order By: Relevance
“…Sixty-five birds were recaptured in the wild before the end of their transmitters' life span (1e3 years) and fitted with a new transmitter (20 g model RI-2D-M). Two trapping methods were used: snares at a male display site around a stuffed dummy female houbara from the ECWP captive breeding for trapping males or snares around a nest or wild-caught chicks for trapping females (Hardouin et al, 2012;Hingrat et al, 2004;Seddon, Launay, Van Heezik, & Al Bowardi, 1999). In the latter method, all of the chicks in the nest were captured (to avoid abandonment by the female) by hand and restrained in a fabric bag large enough to contain all of the chicks, and this bag was placed under a bush surrounded by snares.…”
Section: Ethical Notementioning
confidence: 99%
See 2 more Smart Citations
“…Sixty-five birds were recaptured in the wild before the end of their transmitters' life span (1e3 years) and fitted with a new transmitter (20 g model RI-2D-M). Two trapping methods were used: snares at a male display site around a stuffed dummy female houbara from the ECWP captive breeding for trapping males or snares around a nest or wild-caught chicks for trapping females (Hardouin et al, 2012;Hingrat et al, 2004;Seddon, Launay, Van Heezik, & Al Bowardi, 1999). In the latter method, all of the chicks in the nest were captured (to avoid abandonment by the female) by hand and restrained in a fabric bag large enough to contain all of the chicks, and this bag was placed under a bush surrounded by snares.…”
Section: Ethical Notementioning
confidence: 99%
“…Finally, when harnesses were retrieved without the bird in the field, we considered the bird to be dead (feathers and/or blood found close to the harness). The radiocollars appeared to have no effect on houbara survival once the birds were released (for details on wild and released houbara survival probabilities, refer to Hardouin et al, 2012Hardouin et al, , 2014Hardouin et al, , 2015. Sixty-five birds were recaptured in the wild before the end of their transmitters' life span (1e3 years) and fitted with a new transmitter (20 g model RI-2D-M).…”
Section: Ethical Notementioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…In the case of young females (3 year old and younger), the NDD had a clear positive relationship with body condition, a pattern not observed in older females. In fact, if dispersal is fueled by stored energy, a disperser with large energy stores (good body condition) might be able to encounter, visit, and sample a larger number of potential habitats before running out of energy than a disperser with low energy resources (Hardouin et al., 2012; Stamps, 2006; Tilgar et al., 2010). This has been reported in ground squirrels Spermophilus beldingi (Holekamp & Sherman, 1989), eagle owls Bubo bubo (del Mar Delgado et al., 2010), greater flamingos Phoenicopterus ruber roseus (Barbraud et al., 2003), and Spanish Imperial eagles Aquila adalberti (Soutullo et al., 2013).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…(2009) suggest that the probability of surviving to independence is closely related to a nestling’s own quality or body condition. In fact, the onset of dispersal is generally associated with high mortality rates due to predation, stress, energy depletion, and the lack of familiarity with novel environments (Hardouin et al., 2012). Thus, postfledging survival may be influenced by nestling mass because heavier individuals are fitter and so are better equipped to cope with short periods of food shortage (Green & Cockburn, 2001; Hsu, Dijkstra, & Groothuis, 2017), for example.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%