2009
DOI: 10.1590/s1676-06032009000300016
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Abstract: The ability of a species to defend itself against a predator is directly correlated with its survivorship. Thus, prey/predator interaction mechanisms are important elements of the natural history of species. In this study, we examined the defensive repertoire of the South-American hognose snake (Xenodon dorbignyi) through simulations of predator attacks in the field. Nine defensive displays were observed. The most frequently observed displays were erratic movements, body flattening, head triangulation and tail… Show more

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Cited by 18 publications
(14 citation statements)
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“…These differences between studies may result from the different ecosystems where they were conducted. Head triangulation behavior, recurrently shown in the literature (Tozetti et al 2009, Marques et al 2001a), seems to be an effective strategy that results in a higher survival rate. Lower predations rates are also shown in other mimetic systems.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 83%
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“…These differences between studies may result from the different ecosystems where they were conducted. Head triangulation behavior, recurrently shown in the literature (Tozetti et al 2009, Marques et al 2001a), seems to be an effective strategy that results in a higher survival rate. Lower predations rates are also shown in other mimetic systems.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 83%
“…However, these results were contested by Valkonen & Mappes (2012). Our hypotheses are: (1) snakes with triangular head suffer less predation pressure; (2) as the snake's head is an important target, the head has higher attack rate (Langkilde et al 2004, Niskanen & Mappes 2005; and (3) snakes with triangular head, supposedly to intimidate visual predators (Tozetti et al 2009), suffer higher attack rate on the head than on other parts of the body, setting up more accurate attacks.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 97%
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“…Reptiles, especially snakes, represent an important food source for a large number of vertebrates, especially birds and mammals (Greene 1997, Hinman et al 1997, Buasso et al 2006, Tozetti et al 2009). However, little is known on how the habitat interferes in predation rates or whether habitat changes can maximize the action of a given type of predator.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%