2009
DOI: 10.1099/jmm.0.007799-0
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Cutaneous infection caused by Aspergillus terreus

Abstract: Aspergillus species are widely distributed in nature, and more than 30 species have been reported to be involved in human and animal infection. Cutaneous infections due to Aspergillus terreus are particularly rare. In this report, we describe a case of cutaneous infection caused by A. terreus in a paediatric patient who underwent surgical treatment for an open tibial fracture secondary to an agricultural accident.

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Cited by 24 publications
(21 citation statements)
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“…Nodules and pustular lesions although rare might also occur. [135] Our patient presented with nodules, which ulcerated after attempted incision and drainage in a referral clinic. There have been cases reported in the axillae and perineum of neonates, and in these patients the lesions typically originate as erythematous patches or Plaque that develop into pustules and eventually ulcerate to form necrotic eschars.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 98%
“…Nodules and pustular lesions although rare might also occur. [135] Our patient presented with nodules, which ulcerated after attempted incision and drainage in a referral clinic. There have been cases reported in the axillae and perineum of neonates, and in these patients the lesions typically originate as erythematous patches or Plaque that develop into pustules and eventually ulcerate to form necrotic eschars.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 98%
“…Of the over 30 species of Aspergillus that have been associated with human infection, four were reported to cause eumycetoma, i.e. A. flavus , A. fumigatus , A. nidulans and A. terreus …”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Others, such as A. terreus (subgenus Terrei, section Terrei) and A. versicolor (subgenus Nidulantes, section Nidulantes), are occasionally isolated from clinical specimens (3,29). The disease conditions, ranging from localized skin infection, nail infection, ocular infection, and pulmonary disorder to invasive systemic Aspergillus infection causing diskospondylitis, osteomyelitis, and pyelonephritis, are collectively referred to as "aspergillosis," an umbrella term coined by Hinson, Moon, and Plummer in 1952 (7,30,31,38,42).…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%