2019
DOI: 10.31234/osf.io/w6dpa
| View full text |Cite
Preprint
|
Sign up to set email alerts
|

Abstract: To reach sustainability transitions, we must learn to leverage social systems into tipping points, where societies exhibit positive feedback loops in the adoption of sustainable behavioural or cultural traits. For instance, future sustainability transitions are often portrayed as having roughly ‘S-shaped’ timelines, introducing pro-environmental lifestyles at an increasingly fast rate until a new sustainable state is reached. However, much less is known about the most efficient ways to reach such transitions, … Show more

Help me understand this report
View published versions

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
5

Citation Types

0
14
0

Year Published

2021
2021
2021
2021

Publication Types

Select...
1

Relationship

0
1

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 1 publication
(14 citation statements)
references
References 50 publications
(89 reference statements)
0
14
0
Order By: Relevance
“…The growing threat of abrupt and irreversible adverse tipping points in climate change 13 and other Earth Systems 3 suggest that radical, nonlinear and collective change in human behavior is required to counter these processes. This nonlinear assumption is often embodied in models of sustainable development, which assume behavior change (and, e.g., related clean technology adoption or emission reduction) to follow a roughly S-shaped timeline, where societies reach self-reinforcing changes in collective behavior patterns, eventually settling down in a new sustainable state 1,[14][15][16] . In practice, achieving such a transition requires the triggering of social tipping points, or self-reinforcing and nonlinear changes in collective behavior patterns [14][15][16] .…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 4 more Smart Citations
“…The growing threat of abrupt and irreversible adverse tipping points in climate change 13 and other Earth Systems 3 suggest that radical, nonlinear and collective change in human behavior is required to counter these processes. This nonlinear assumption is often embodied in models of sustainable development, which assume behavior change (and, e.g., related clean technology adoption or emission reduction) to follow a roughly S-shaped timeline, where societies reach self-reinforcing changes in collective behavior patterns, eventually settling down in a new sustainable state 1,[14][15][16] . In practice, achieving such a transition requires the triggering of social tipping points, or self-reinforcing and nonlinear changes in collective behavior patterns [14][15][16] .…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…This nonlinear assumption is often embodied in models of sustainable development, which assume behavior change (and, e.g., related clean technology adoption or emission reduction) to follow a roughly S-shaped timeline, where societies reach self-reinforcing changes in collective behavior patterns, eventually settling down in a new sustainable state 1,[14][15][16] . In practice, achieving such a transition requires the triggering of social tipping points, or self-reinforcing and nonlinear changes in collective behavior patterns [14][15][16] . Social tipping points, in turn, require tapping into the various feedback-loops that trigger selfreinforcing cultural evolution (as elaborated below) 14 .…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 3 more Smart Citations