2001
DOI: 10.1080/13662710120034400
| View full text |Cite
|
Sign up to set email alerts
|

Abstract: This article is concerned with the processes through which technological standards are developed, and how these standards provide the underpinnings of new markets for global cellular communication. The case investigated is that of so-called third generation mobile communications, involving advanced multimedia and Internet access. The article explores how the main actors at the outset, used the process of standardization to strategically strengthen their respective market positions, and how standardization wars… Show more

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
2
1
1

Citation Types

0
16
0

Year Published

2004
2004
2021
2021

Publication Types

Select...
7
1

Relationship

0
8

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 71 publications
(16 citation statements)
references
References 8 publications
0
16
0
Order By: Relevance
“…However, greater participation often reduces the efficiency of the standard-setting process as it becomes more difficult to reach consensus (Tamm Hallström, 2008). Partly because of the need to strike a balance between efficiency and a high degree of participation, standardisation organisations vary in form and change their relationship with other organisations over time (Glimstedt, 2001). In order to produce standards quickly, such organisations would have to limit participation in the process of standard-setting to a few parties or parties with similar interests and ideas -in extreme cases, to a single expert.…”
Section: Dynamics Related To Standardisation By Organisationsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…However, greater participation often reduces the efficiency of the standard-setting process as it becomes more difficult to reach consensus (Tamm Hallström, 2008). Partly because of the need to strike a balance between efficiency and a high degree of participation, standardisation organisations vary in form and change their relationship with other organisations over time (Glimstedt, 2001). In order to produce standards quickly, such organisations would have to limit participation in the process of standard-setting to a few parties or parties with similar interests and ideas -in extreme cases, to a single expert.…”
Section: Dynamics Related To Standardisation By Organisationsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…ETSI (European Telecommunications Standards Institute) and other regional standards development organizations (SDOs) have provided "important epistemic communities" (Humphreys & Simpson, 2005, p. 48) for "user-led" standards development (Hawkins, 1995, p. 29). Nevertheless, 'standards-led' EC competitive strategy faltered by the late 1990s (Glimstedt, 2001;Humphreys & Simpson, 2005) -as did EC procurement policies that advantaged European vendors by requiring reference to European standards developed by ETSI and other EC-recognized SDOs (Bekkers, 2001). Although the EC has more recently moved towards "technologically neutral" telecommunications public supply contracts, past policies and their effects on infrastructure investment have continued to induce strong bias in technological choices made in procurement (Bekkers, 2001, pp.…”
Section: Producer Dominationmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Technological competitiveness is important for national economic performance, particularly with national introductions of stronger intellectual property rights, regulatory harmonization and standardization, and the worldwide spread of emerging ICT [5,6]. Technological capabilities are the conceptual-level elements that capture technological competitiveness in operation.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%