The Oxford Handbook of Positive Psychology 2009
DOI: 10.1093/oxfordhb/9780195187243.013.0037
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Compassion

Abstract: This chapter reviews historical and modern perspectives on the positive emotion of compassion. From the time of Aristotle, compassion has been defined as an emotion experienced when individuals witness another person suffering through serious troubles, which are not self-inflicted and that we can picture ourselves experiencing. Compassion at its core is, therefore, a process of connecting by identifying with another person. The identification with others generated from compassion can then provide the motivatio… Show more

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Cited by 40 publications
(54 citation statements)
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“…The quiet-ego facet of perspective-taking-which involves reflection on others' points of view-provides a criticalthinking counterbalance to the social bonds and acceptance that are facilitated by inclusive identity. Perspective-taking involves an ability to shift attention away from the self (Cassell 2002;Davis 1983), which facilitates not merely compassion but a conceptual understanding of the conditions of those for whom one feels compassion by virtue of inclusive identity.…”
Section: Balancing the Self And Othersmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The quiet-ego facet of perspective-taking-which involves reflection on others' points of view-provides a criticalthinking counterbalance to the social bonds and acceptance that are facilitated by inclusive identity. Perspective-taking involves an ability to shift attention away from the self (Cassell 2002;Davis 1983), which facilitates not merely compassion but a conceptual understanding of the conditions of those for whom one feels compassion by virtue of inclusive identity.…”
Section: Balancing the Self And Othersmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The related discipline of Positive Psychology has also given emphasis to the importance of compassion, focusing on compassion as individual states and traits supporting interpersonal dealings (Cassell, 2002;Neff, Rude, & Kirkpatrick, 2007). In contrast, in Positive Organizational Behavior, compassion has not been included in the construct of Positive Psychological Capital due to the lack of evidence that it can be reliably measured and developed through organizational interventions with measurable performance impact (Luthans & Youssef, 2004;Luthans, Youssef, & Avolio, 2007;Youssef & Luthans, 2012).…”
Section: Constituting Legitimate Compassionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Compassion is centrally a process of connecting by identifying with another (Cassell, 2002), and the creation of social connections is associated with reductions in crime and violence (Goleman, 2006). Furthermore, compassion evokes not only empathy for the suffering of another but also a desire to do something to relieve that suffering.…”
Section: Invitations For a Compassionate Approachmentioning
confidence: 99%