2008
DOI: 10.1590/s1517-83822008000200012 View full text |Buy / Rent full text
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Abstract: This prospective study evaluated semiquantitative and qualitative catheter-culture methods for diagnosis of catheter-related infection (CRI) in newborns. Catheter tips from newborns admitted to the Neonatal Unit of the University Hospital of the Botucatu Medical School, UNESP were included in the study. Catheter cultures were performed with both semiquantitative and qualitative techniques. For CRI diagnosis, microorganisms isolated from catheter cultures and from peripheral blood cultures were identified and s… Show more

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“…Supplementary Table S1 shows the characteristics of the studies in our analyses. Most studies (39 out of 45) [11–26, 2830, 3343, 45–52] were prospective in nature, 26 studies [7, 10, 12, 16, 1820, 24, 2831, 3436, 38, 40, 42, 43, 46–48, 50, 52] reported on the diagnostic accuracy of the semi-quantitative method and 30 [7, 11–15, 17, 21–23, 2527, 29, 3234, 37–47, 50, 51] on quantitative methods such as catheter segment, IVD-drawn or paired lysis cultures. Three studies were conducted in Australia, and the rest were from the Americas (USA and Brazil), France, Spain and the UK.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
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“…Supplementary Table S1 shows the characteristics of the studies in our analyses. Most studies (39 out of 45) [11–26, 2830, 3343, 45–52] were prospective in nature, 26 studies [7, 10, 12, 16, 1820, 24, 2831, 3436, 38, 40, 42, 43, 46–48, 50, 52] reported on the diagnostic accuracy of the semi-quantitative method and 30 [7, 11–15, 17, 21–23, 2527, 29, 3234, 37–47, 50, 51] on quantitative methods such as catheter segment, IVD-drawn or paired lysis cultures. Three studies were conducted in Australia, and the rest were from the Americas (USA and Brazil), France, Spain and the UK.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
“…2); 18 of 45 (see note on previous page) studies [7, 10, 11, 21–24, 30, 3336, 38, 40, 46–50] showed a high risk of bias in conduct and interpretation of the index tests. Likewise, 16 studies [1619, 21, 2731, 3436, 38, 40] had high risks of bias in conduct and interpretation of reference standards; and 14 [7, 10, 1315, 21–27, 29, 51] had high risks of bias in patient flow and interval between index tests and reference standards.
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Section: Resultsmentioning
“…But, by semiquantitative culture lower sensitivity (85%) and higher specificity (82%) was noted. In a study done by Marconi et al 32 in 2008 they concluded that the semiquantitative culture is a rapid and efficient technique for diagnosing catheter-related infection. Still, it requires a careful interpretation and its results need to be interpreted carefully for diagnosis and specific treatment.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
“…The microbiological diagnosis of catheter related infection is very important, because therapy varies based on the microorganism isolated and its resistance pattern. S. epidermidis and other coagulase-negative Staphylococci usually adhere to the surfaces of the catheters to form slime/glycocalyx after catheter insertion into the vascular system ( 10 ). Colonization of microorganisms at the catheter insertion site was an independent risk factor, showing the importance of skin as a reservoir for catheter tip colonization ( 9 ).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning