2007
DOI: 10.1016/s0140-6736(07)60376-6
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Clinical, educational, and epidemiological value of autopsy

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Cited by 361 publications
(310 citation statements)
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References 85 publications
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“…The results from this study serve as a reminder of some of the possible consequences of a decreasing autopsy rate (28). Survival estimates for the majority of injury categories were unaffected by the addition of autopsy data.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 77%
“…The results from this study serve as a reminder of some of the possible consequences of a decreasing autopsy rate (28). Survival estimates for the majority of injury categories were unaffected by the addition of autopsy data.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 77%
“…As a means of keeping updated with anatomy over time, students on clinical rotations are encouraged to attend autopsies (Parker, 2002;Burton and Underwood, 2007). Unlike preserved and discolored cadavers, newly deceased patients are much more realistic, accompanied with medical histories and possess signs that govern diagnostic and prognostic implications.…”
Section: Autopsymentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The misdiagnosis on two separate histologic samples in this case highlights both the importance of autopsy in educating the medical community, and the challenges in making this diagnosis [16,17]. The diagnostic criteria for MFH is a continuous subject of debate amongst pathologists [13].…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 90%