2011
DOI: 10.1590/s1519-566x2011000200001
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Climate change and its effects on terrestrial insects and herbivory patterns

Abstract: Climate change and extreme weather events affect plants and animals and the direct impact of anthropogenic climate change has been documented extensively over the past years. In this review, I address the main consequences of elevated CO 2 and O 3 concentrations, elevated temperature and changes in rainfall patterns on the interactions between insects and their host plants. Because of their tight relationship with host plants, insect herbivores are expected to suffer direct and indirect effects of climate chan… Show more

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Cited by 186 publications
(126 citation statements)
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References 51 publications
(91 reference statements)
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“…An unambiguous indicator that elevated CO 2 reduces insect growth rates by altering the chemical and physical properties of foliage is that insects consume more high-CO 2 foliage, an average of 14% more, to maintain lower growth rates. Increased consumption of low-quality food to meet critical nutrient limitations is referred to as "compensatory feeding" and may portend greater herbivore damage to both managed and natural ecosystems as CO 2 continues to increase (Cornelissen, 2011).…”
Section: Plants As Food: Co 2 and Temperature Effects On Leaf Chemistrymentioning
confidence: 99%
“…An unambiguous indicator that elevated CO 2 reduces insect growth rates by altering the chemical and physical properties of foliage is that insects consume more high-CO 2 foliage, an average of 14% more, to maintain lower growth rates. Increased consumption of low-quality food to meet critical nutrient limitations is referred to as "compensatory feeding" and may portend greater herbivore damage to both managed and natural ecosystems as CO 2 continues to increase (Cornelissen, 2011).…”
Section: Plants As Food: Co 2 and Temperature Effects On Leaf Chemistrymentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Insect herbivore which consumed plant lowered nutritional quality as food will cause a reduction in their performance, including by reducing their growth rates and prolonging their development time (Goverde and Erhardt, 2003). Indirectly, the mortality imposed by natural enemies increase (Stiling et al, 2003), finally reducing the abundance, diversity, and richness of herbivore if compared to ambient CO 2 environments (Cornelissen, 2011).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Species are affected directly, by physiological changes, and indirectly, by effects on interacting species [17]. Distribution ranges and synchrony of interacting partners can become mismatched so that the overlapping area and period are reduced, respectively [18,19].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Models predict increasing mismatches, spatially and temporally [20], which can result in the extinction of interacting species [21]. Insect species with narrow substrate preferences for egg laying are especially vulnerable [17]. Hence, knowledge of the preferred oviposition substrate is a crucial factor when predicting a species’ future under changed environmental conditions such as under climate warming.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%