2011
DOI: 10.1590/s1415-47572011005000042
| View full text |Cite
|
Sign up to set email alerts
|

Abstract: Chromosomal mapping of the butterfly lizards Leiolepis belliana belliana and L. boehmei was done using the 18S-28S and 5S rRNA genes and telomeric (TTAGGG)n sequences. The karyotype of L. b. belliana was 2n = 36, whereas that of L. boehmei was 2n = 34. The 18S-28S rRNA genes were located at the secondary constriction of the long arm of chromosome 1, while the 5S rRNA genes were found in the pericentromeric region of chromosome 6 in both species. Hybridization signals for the (TTAGGG)n sequence were observed at… Show more

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
3
1
1

Citation Types

2
25
0

Year Published

2013
2013
2020
2020

Publication Types

Select...
8
1

Relationship

0
9

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 22 publications
(27 citation statements)
references
References 14 publications
(28 reference statements)
2
25
0
Order By: Relevance
“…In Aspidoscelis marmorata (Baird & Girard, 1852), the same pattern was located in a macrochromosome pair (Porter et al 1991). Furthermore, it was possible to observe a size heteromorphism of the sites between the homologue chromosomes in the four analyzed species, a fact also described for other lizard species (O’Meally et al 2009, Srikunath et al 2009b, Srikunath et al 2011). Such a size heteromorphism is likely associated with unequal crossing-over mechanisms, rearrangements such as transpositions, deletions and/or duplications or variations in the number of rDNA copies present in such regions that would entail some changes in ribosomal sites (Gross et al 2010, Ribeiro et al 2008).…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 68%
“…In Aspidoscelis marmorata (Baird & Girard, 1852), the same pattern was located in a macrochromosome pair (Porter et al 1991). Furthermore, it was possible to observe a size heteromorphism of the sites between the homologue chromosomes in the four analyzed species, a fact also described for other lizard species (O’Meally et al 2009, Srikunath et al 2009b, Srikunath et al 2011). Such a size heteromorphism is likely associated with unequal crossing-over mechanisms, rearrangements such as transpositions, deletions and/or duplications or variations in the number of rDNA copies present in such regions that would entail some changes in ribosomal sites (Gross et al 2010, Ribeiro et al 2008).…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 68%
“…The absence of interstitial telomeric sequences in CPI corresponds with previous reports in other turtles which also lack them (e.g., Trachemys dorbigni and Chelonoidis donosobarrosi [ Martinez et al 2009 ]), as well as tuatara ( O’Meally et al 2009 ). However, these data contrast with lizards where they are present, for example, in microchromosomes in Pogona vitticeps ( Young et al 2013 ), macrochromosomes in Iberolacerta monticola ( Rojo et al 2014 ) or both in Leiolepis lizards ( Srikulnath et al 2011 ). However, additional data on the chromosomal location of telomeric sequences in a larger subset of turtle taxa are needed to test whether such contrasting patterns among these major reptilian lineages are generalizable.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 78%
“…In the Russian sturgeon (Acipenser gueldenstaedtii) and in the lake sturgeon (A. fulvescens) , 2 entire microchromosomes showed bright fluorescence signals derived from the telomeric probe [Fontana et al, 1998[Fontana et al, , 2004. Similar distribution patterns of the hybridization signals have been described in some of the bird and reptile microchromosomes [Nanda et al, 2002;Srikulnath et al, 2011]. To intersperse with the entire microchromosomes, telomeric DNA sequences must have undergone extensive amplification processes extending telomeric arrays to an exceptional length ranging from 40 kb to 2 Mb or even longer [Delany et al, 2000].…”
Section: Telomeric Dna Repeats Interspersed With the Entire Sturgeon mentioning
confidence: 79%