2021
DOI: 10.1093/treephys/tpab042
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Changes in leaf functional traits with leaf age: when do leaves decrease their photosynthetic capacity in Amazonian trees?

Abstract: Most leaf functional trait studies in the Amazon basin do not consider ontogenetic variations (leaf age), which may influence ecosystem productivity throughout the year. When leaf age is taken into account, it is generally considered discontinuous, and leaves are classified into age categories based on qualitative observations. Here, we quantified age-dependent changes in leaf functional traits such as the maximum carboxylation rate of ribulose-1,5-biphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) (Vcmax), stomatal … Show more

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Cited by 15 publications
(9 citation statements)
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“…For analyses of leaf age class, we used age (young, middle, old) as an additional main effect, and tested for interactions with domestication status. Leaf age was included as a factor in analyses of both trait means or trait variability: we did not want to impose constraints on how our broad array of traits should differ across leaf ontogeny by ordering or ranking leaf age categories, as nonlinear trait trajectories across ontogeny may be common in plants (Aasamaa et al, 2005; Barton & Koricheva, 2010; Menezes et al, 2021; Niinemets, 2016). In addition, for measures of trait variability across ontogeny, we do not have clear theoretical predictions for if and how among‐leaf trait variability should differ across cohorts of leaf age.…”
Section: Methodsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…For analyses of leaf age class, we used age (young, middle, old) as an additional main effect, and tested for interactions with domestication status. Leaf age was included as a factor in analyses of both trait means or trait variability: we did not want to impose constraints on how our broad array of traits should differ across leaf ontogeny by ordering or ranking leaf age categories, as nonlinear trait trajectories across ontogeny may be common in plants (Aasamaa et al, 2005; Barton & Koricheva, 2010; Menezes et al, 2021; Niinemets, 2016). In addition, for measures of trait variability across ontogeny, we do not have clear theoretical predictions for if and how among‐leaf trait variability should differ across cohorts of leaf age.…”
Section: Methodsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Nutritional effects did not remain stable over the seasons. Even though a reduction in leaf quality towards later seasons is expected to be common among plant species [4,38,41], using season alone as a proxy for leaf quality poses some problems due to differences in the base level of the leaf nutritional content between tree species. Other factors, such as predation pressure, can also vary between seasons [53,87], obscuring the mechanisms through which the seasonal progression affects the caterpillar community.…”
Section: Nutritional and Seasonal Effects On Caterpillar Traitsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Tougher, high Ccontent plant material can affect the caterpillar feeding traits by requiring stronger head musculature [33][34][35] or by selecting for smaller species or individuals that can selectively consume the more palatable portions within the leaf (reviewed in [36]). C content increases while N often decreases with leaf maturation [4,17,37] (but see [38]). A similar pattern follows for leaves produced later in the season [39], and these changes can have profound effects on caterpillar growth and defenses [16].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
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“…Previous studies have shown that leaf physiological and biochemical changes with leaf senescence. For example, Menezes et al (2021) found that photosynthetic capacity decreased with increasing leaf age. Kamran et al (2020) reported that peroxidase (POD) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities decreased continuously during leaf development while malondialdehyde (MDA) and hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) concentrations increased.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%