2003
DOI: 10.1590/s1516-44462003000100001
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Challenging the stigma of schizophrenia

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Cited by 17 publications
(6 citation statements)
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“…These consequences contribute to the disability produced by the disorder and establish a vicious circle of disadvantage increasing the burden on patients and their families. 4 Several studies on public stigma, undertaken in different countries, point to people with schizophrenia facing a great amount of stigma in society and also to schizophrenia being one of the mental disorders most stigmatized by the general population. [5][6][7][8][9] Even though public stigma towards schizophrenia can be a problem that affects the majority of countries and cultures, it is important to understand how it is built and manifested in specific cultural contexts.…”
Section: Public Stigma and Schizophreniamentioning
confidence: 99%
“…These consequences contribute to the disability produced by the disorder and establish a vicious circle of disadvantage increasing the burden on patients and their families. 4 Several studies on public stigma, undertaken in different countries, point to people with schizophrenia facing a great amount of stigma in society and also to schizophrenia being one of the mental disorders most stigmatized by the general population. [5][6][7][8][9] Even though public stigma towards schizophrenia can be a problem that affects the majority of countries and cultures, it is important to understand how it is built and manifested in specific cultural contexts.…”
Section: Public Stigma and Schizophreniamentioning
confidence: 99%
“…28 In addition, prejudice and discrimination related to schizophrenia have been observed to result in poor treatment compliance. 29 In a study about internalized stigma, Ritsher and Phelan 12 found that alienation predicted depressive symptoms and reduced self-esteem, suggesting that it may be very difficult for individuals to escape, without assistance, a vicious circle of low self-esteem and alienation negatively impacting on each other. 12 Awareness of illness may result in better functional outcome, but if awareness is accompanied by acceptance of stigmatizing beliefs, greater social dysfunction, less hope, and lower self-esteem become more likely.…”
Section: Course and Outcomementioning
confidence: 99%
“…33,34 Finally, there is evidence that prejudice and discrimination related to schizophrenia result in an increased probability of misuse of alcohol and drugs. 29 Stigmatization can have detrimental consequences for both objective and subjective quality of life (QOL). Attributing one's problems to a mental illness is associated with reduced subjective QOL among persons with schizophrenia, much of which may be mediated by perceived stigma and lower self-esteem.…”
Section: Course and Outcomementioning
confidence: 99%
“…There is substantial evidence in the literature that, worldwide, those with SMI are rejected and discriminated against (Angermeyer & Matschinger, 1997; Guimon, Fischer, & Sartorius, 1999; Link, Struening, Rahav, Phelan, & Nuttbrock, 1997; Ohaeri & Abdullahi, 2001; Thara & Srinivasan, 2000; Villares & Sartorius, 2003). Link and Phelan (Link & Phelan, 2001) theorize that stigma occurs as a process of discrimination and rejection at individual (e.g., experiences of rejection by others) and structural (e.g., poor access to services, denial of housing, residing in poor neighborhoods) levels, and also as a result of social-psychological responses of the stigmatized individual (e.g., lost of mastery, decreased self-esteem, negative self-view).…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%