2012
DOI: 10.1590/s0074-02762012000800012
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Abstract: The haematological changes and release of soluble mediators, particularly C-reactive protein (CRP) and nitric oxide (NO), during uncomplicated malaria have not been well studied, especially in Brazilian areas in which the disease is endemic. Therefore, the present study examined these factors in acute (day 0) and convalescent phase (day 15) patients infected with Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax malaria in the Brazilian Amazon. Haematologic parameters were measured using automated cell counting, CRP … Show more

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Cited by 22 publications
(23 citation statements)
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References 47 publications
(23 reference statements)
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“…The acute phase response in malaria is largely an innate mechanism, involving the activation of both CRP-dependent and non CRP-dependent pathways. 31 It is plausible that when transmission is intense, the CRP-dependent mechanism assumes a more dominant role. 31 The observed disparity in the association between malaria and CRP across the two malaria seasons may also be explained by the difference in the duration of the acute phase response in the two transmission seasons.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…The acute phase response in malaria is largely an innate mechanism, involving the activation of both CRP-dependent and non CRP-dependent pathways. 31 It is plausible that when transmission is intense, the CRP-dependent mechanism assumes a more dominant role. 31 The observed disparity in the association between malaria and CRP across the two malaria seasons may also be explained by the difference in the duration of the acute phase response in the two transmission seasons.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…31 It is plausible that when transmission is intense, the CRP-dependent mechanism assumes a more dominant role. 31 The observed disparity in the association between malaria and CRP across the two malaria seasons may also be explained by the difference in the duration of the acute phase response in the two transmission seasons. In the low malaria season however, only 25% of malaria cases were associated with elevated CRP, and interestingly, the mean retinol concentration was significantly reduced in all malaria-positive cases, with or without a concurrent elevation in CRP.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…In this case, early or premature release of neutrophils from the bone marrow occurs, resulting in an increased proportion of younger, less well-differentiated neutrophils into the circulation. Though this alteration is common knowledge in other acute diseases, very few studies evaluating these disturbances have been conducted for this cell type in malaria patients (Hanscheid et al 2008, Lima-Junior et al 2012). …”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…For example, a higher percentage of immature neutrophils (band cells) with impaired phagocytic capacity and ROS production has been reported in blood samples of patients with visceral leishmaniasis (Yizengaw et al, 2016) or individuals in the acute phase of P. falciparum and P. vivax infections (Lima-Junior et al, 2012). In the latter, impaired neutrophil development was linked to release of heme during parasite-induced lysis of red blood cells, which induces heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) that consequently affects development of myeloid progenitor cells (Cunnington et al, 2011, 2012).…”
Section: Parasitesmentioning
confidence: 99%