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Cited by 17 publications
(16 citation statements)
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“…Nevus spilus may be found in neurofibromatosis and the relationship of nevus spilus to cafe au lait macules is not well understood and both may occur in the same patient (Eady et al 1975). However, macromelanosomes are not present in cafe au lait macules of normal people (Johnson & Charneeo 1970) or of patients with Albright's syndrome (Benedict et al 1968). Glimcher & Szabo (1978) described giant pigment granules in scrotal skin of black Long-Evans rats but these are 3 times smaller than those of humans.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Nevus spilus may be found in neurofibromatosis and the relationship of nevus spilus to cafe au lait macules is not well understood and both may occur in the same patient (Eady et al 1975). However, macromelanosomes are not present in cafe au lait macules of normal people (Johnson & Charneeo 1970) or of patients with Albright's syndrome (Benedict et al 1968). Glimcher & Szabo (1978) described giant pigment granules in scrotal skin of black Long-Evans rats but these are 3 times smaller than those of humans.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The presence of six or more cafe au lait spots larger than 1.5 em in diameter makes the diagnosis of neurofibromatosis more likely (5). ' Johnson and Charneco (6) reported that the cafe au lait spots of patients with neurofibromatosis contain more dopa-positive melanocytes per square millimeter than does their surrounding skin. On the other hand, cafe au lait spots in patients without neurofibromatosis contained fewer dopa-positive melanocytes than did the surrounding skin (6).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Early histological studies on the pigmentary CALMs of NF1 patients have mainly focused on melanocyte densities in the epidermal basal membrane. Some inconsistencies arose, when certain authors demonstrated a significant increase in melanocyte density in CALMs compared with the normally pigmented skin of the same patient (Johnson & Charneco, 1970), while others only observed this difference in a few cases (Benedict et al, 1968). Frenk & Marazzi (1984) analyzed the ratio of melanocytes and keratinocytes in normal and CALM skin of NF1 patients compared with skin of healthy individuals.…”
Section: Pigmentary Cutaneous Defects In Nf1mentioning
confidence: 99%