2015
DOI: 10.1590/s1677-5538.ibju.2014.0383
| View full text |Cite
|
Sign up to set email alerts
|

Abstract: Purpose:To explore the association of body mass index (BMI) and comorbidity with renal function after nephrectomy.Materials and Methods:We retrospectively analyzed 263 patients submitted to partial or radical nephrectomy from 2000-2013. Variables assessed included BMI, Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI), race, tobacco use, tumor histology, surgical approach, Fuhrman nuclear grade, and tumor (T) classification. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was estimated using the Cockroft-Gault equation, adjusted for gender. … Show more

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
4
1

Citation Types

2
5
0

Year Published

2016
2016
2021
2021

Publication Types

Select...
8

Relationship

0
8

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 11 publications
(7 citation statements)
references
References 35 publications
2
5
0
Order By: Relevance
“…We have reported previously that age ≥65 years, lower preoperative eGFR, and male sex were associated with incident CKD in patients with T1a RCC managed with radical nephrectomy, 12 which is consistent with the findings of this study (Table 2), and the existing literature. 21,22 The finding that BMI >30 kg/m 2 was associated with CKD has also been reported previously, 23 and is likely because increased body weight can adversely affect the health of the kidneys through many downstream mediators, typically leading to increased oxidative stress, inflammation, ectopic lipid accumulation, and glomerular hypertension. 24 We found that diabetes mellitus was not a mediator of the association between obesity and postoperative CKD.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 63%
“…We have reported previously that age ≥65 years, lower preoperative eGFR, and male sex were associated with incident CKD in patients with T1a RCC managed with radical nephrectomy, 12 which is consistent with the findings of this study (Table 2), and the existing literature. 21,22 The finding that BMI >30 kg/m 2 was associated with CKD has also been reported previously, 23 and is likely because increased body weight can adversely affect the health of the kidneys through many downstream mediators, typically leading to increased oxidative stress, inflammation, ectopic lipid accumulation, and glomerular hypertension. 24 We found that diabetes mellitus was not a mediator of the association between obesity and postoperative CKD.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 63%
“…Initially, HTN/DM was associated with a slightly more detrimental effect on the eGFR, but was also associated with faster recovery, ultimately leading to a predicted eGFR that was the same (83 mL/min/1.73 m 2 ) for both groups 24 months after PN. eGFR outcome was similar despite the higher age, tumor size, BMI, CCI and lower baseline eGFR in the HTN/DM group, all of which are associated with worse functional outcome . Because all patients had normal baseline kidney function (i.e.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 87%
“…eGFR outcome was similar despite the higher age, tumor size, BMI, CCI and lower baseline eGFR in the HTN/DM group, all of which are associated with worse functional outcome. 13,14 Because all patients had normal baseline kidney function (i.e. eGFR ≥60), it is likely that sufficient nephron reserve negated the detrimental effect of DM and HTN on functional outcome in 2 years.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Our findings dovetail with a recent report by Isharwal et al [25] demonstrating that comorbidity status fails to predict renal functional decline after renal surgery. The literature in this space is contradictory [23,26,27], but the greatest predictor of eGFR decline to ≤45 mL/min/1.73 m 2 remains RN [28,29]. Woldu et al [30] recently compared renal functional outcomes after NSS and RN among patients with CKD I and II.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%