2009
DOI: 10.1590/s1676-06032009000300039
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Abstract: Abstract:The behavior of foragers can directly affect the dispersal of seeds. Strangler figs are keystone resources throughout the tropics and are important resources for both primates and birds. We examined the foraging behavior of golden-handed tamarins and four bird species in a strangler fig to see how these behaviors might affect the dispersal of fig seeds. Tamarins removed fruit at a faster rate than did any of the bird species examined. Additionally, tamarins tended to swallow figs whole whereas birds t… Show more

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Cited by 4 publications
(2 citation statements)
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References 31 publications
(29 reference statements)
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“…While howler monkeys and frugivorous birds visit fruiting figs trees during daytime [ 57 , 58 ], in BCNM, fruit-eating bats of the family Phyllostomidae disperse more than 80% of the seeds of the studied fig species [ 23 , 59 ]. Bat-mediated seed dispersal distances are unknown due to the observational challenges posed by the high mobility and nocturnal lifestyle of bats.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…While howler monkeys and frugivorous birds visit fruiting figs trees during daytime [ 57 , 58 ], in BCNM, fruit-eating bats of the family Phyllostomidae disperse more than 80% of the seeds of the studied fig species [ 23 , 59 ]. Bat-mediated seed dispersal distances are unknown due to the observational challenges posed by the high mobility and nocturnal lifestyle of bats.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…However, Agassiz's name was introduced as an unjustified emendation of Lepitrix Le Peletier de Saint-Fargeau & Serville, 1828 (currently in use for a genus of Scarabeidae Melolonthinae Hopliini beetles, with the emended spelling Lepithrix, see Dalla Torre, 1915). Lepidothrix Bonaparte, 1854 was used as the valid name in at least 25 works by at least 10 authors in the last 50 years over a span of at least 10 years (Prum 1992;Endler & Thery 1996;Thery 1997;Brumfield & Braun 2001;Ridgely & Greenfield 2001;Hilty 2002;Dalgleish & Price 2003;Heindl & Winkler 2003;Snow 2004;Cheviron et al 2005;Ryder & Dures 2005;Engel 2006;Greeney 2006;Restall et al 2006;Sousa 2006;Tori et al 2006;Dures et al 2007;Loiselle et al 2007;Rego et al 2007;Schulenberg et al 2007;Blendinger et al 2008;Buitron-Jurado 2008;Hidalgo et al 2008;Mallet-Rodrigues 2008;Ancies et al 2009;Vanderhoff & Grafton 2009), while Agassiz's name has never been used as a valid name since its creation, and a fortiori since 1899. The requirements of Art.…”
Section: The Spelling Lepidothrix Is Not In Prevailing Usagementioning
confidence: 99%