2002
DOI: 10.1002/j.2050-0416.2002.tb00540.x
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Abstract: The fluorescence spectra and lifetimes of diluted beer have been explored and found not to report on protein removal either by silica or tannic acid, nor polyphenol uptake by PVPP. Comparing the fluorescence spectra of beer with that of tea and hops, it seems that proteins, complex polyphenols and iso-a-acids can contribute to the intrinsic fluorescence of beer, although the contribution from polyphenols must be minimal since treatment with PVPP does not dramatically change the background fluorescence. To elim… Show more

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Cited by 27 publications
(24 citation statements)
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“…In all three samples two distinct peaks are seen with excitation /emission maxima around 290 /350 nm and 340 /430 nm, respectively. The first peak probably arises from protein fluorescence, mainly attributed to tryptophan, while the second peak can be related to fluorescence from complex polyphenols or iso-␣-acids, as suggested by Apperson et al 4 Sample B has a significant higher IBU value than sample A, and thus was expected to contain a higher amount of iso-␣-acids. However the intensity of the peak around 340 /430 nm is not very different for the two samples, indicating that the bitter acids are not the main contributors to the fluorescence signal obtained in this area.…”
Section: Autofluorescencementioning
confidence: 85%
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“…In all three samples two distinct peaks are seen with excitation /emission maxima around 290 /350 nm and 340 /430 nm, respectively. The first peak probably arises from protein fluorescence, mainly attributed to tryptophan, while the second peak can be related to fluorescence from complex polyphenols or iso-␣-acids, as suggested by Apperson et al 4 Sample B has a significant higher IBU value than sample A, and thus was expected to contain a higher amount of iso-␣-acids. However the intensity of the peak around 340 /430 nm is not very different for the two samples, indicating that the bitter acids are not the main contributors to the fluorescence signal obtained in this area.…”
Section: Autofluorescencementioning
confidence: 85%
“…Fluorescence spectroscopy applied directly on food samples evaluated with chemometrics, has among others been suggested for analysis of sugar 7,19 and the oxidative stability of various dairy products 5,10,27 . The intrinsic fluorescence or autofluorescence of undiluted as well as diluted beer was investigated in 2002 by Apperson et al 4 . Inner-filter effects were shown to appear in the fluorescence signal from the undiluted beer samples, expressed by the fact that protein fluorescence was only obtained upon dilution with distilled water.…”
Section: Autofluorescence Spectroscopymentioning
confidence: 99%
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“…The emission at 295 /315 nm has been attributed to tyrosine and not ␤-catechin or epicatechin -the proanthocyanidin monomers. The fluorescence maxima for both catechin and epicatechin occur at 315 nm, when excited at 265 and 280 nm, respectively, hence, they may overlap tyrosine and tryptophan fluorescence 8 .…”
Section: Total Luminescence Spectramentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Both techniques have been successfully used in the analysis of crude oils, pharmaceuticals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, motor oils, and humic matter in water [4][5][6][7] . Fluorescence spectral data and lifetimes in diluted beers have been explored recently 8 . We have reported on the application of total fluorescence spectroscopy to characterize beers 9 .…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%