2021
DOI: 10.1097/aln.0000000000003689 View full text |Buy / Rent full text
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Abstract: Background Removal of cytokines, chemokines, and microvesicles from the supernatant of allogeneic erythrocytes may help mitigate adverse transfusion reactions. Blood bank–based washing procedures present logistical difficulties; therefore, we tested the hypothesis that on-demand bedside washing of allogeneic erythrocyte units is capable of removing soluble factors and is feasible in a clinical setting. Methods There were in v… Show more

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“…For the packed or stored allogeneic RBCs, a mean cell-free hemoglobin concentration could increase from 72.6 mg/dl to 210.5 mg/dl after washing using the CS system. Despite the significantly increased post-wash cell-free hemoglobin, the washed allogeneic salvage was estimated to result in a mild and acceptable increase (3–5 mg/dl) in recipients’ cell-free hemoglobin ( Welsby et al, 2021 ). For the autologous salvage in our report, much lower cell-free hemoglobin concentrations were found in either the HS (82.6 mg/dl) or normal erythrocytic (57.9 mg/dl) patient’s post-wash sample than in the washed allogeneic salvage, so neither patient manifested significant hemolysis after receiving the autologous salvage.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
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“…For the packed or stored allogeneic RBCs, a mean cell-free hemoglobin concentration could increase from 72.6 mg/dl to 210.5 mg/dl after washing using the CS system. Despite the significantly increased post-wash cell-free hemoglobin, the washed allogeneic salvage was estimated to result in a mild and acceptable increase (3–5 mg/dl) in recipients’ cell-free hemoglobin ( Welsby et al, 2021 ). For the autologous salvage in our report, much lower cell-free hemoglobin concentrations were found in either the HS (82.6 mg/dl) or normal erythrocytic (57.9 mg/dl) patient’s post-wash sample than in the washed allogeneic salvage, so neither patient manifested significant hemolysis after receiving the autologous salvage.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
“…The Cell Saver ® (CS) system is designed for autologous blood salvage with the removal of broken blood cells and platelets, reduction of cytokines and chemokines, and increased hemolysis with an acceptable concentration of cell-free hemoglobin ( Welsby et al, 2021 ). The quality of salvaged RBCs from the CS system after washing, centrifugation, and pump rolling, however, remains unclear, with the fragility of salvaged RBCs might be increased under some conditions ( Chung et al, 2019 ), which could lead to more hemolysis after the salvaged RBCs are transfused back to the patient as osmotic fragility is an important determinant in the severity of hemolysis.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning