2016
DOI: 10.1016/j.yhbeh.2015.07.017
| View full text |Cite
|
Sign up to set email alerts
|

Abstract: This article is part of a Special Issue "Parental Care". The effects of differential maternal care received on offspring phenotype in rodents has been extensively studied between litters, but the consequences of differential mothering within litters on offspring neurobehavioral development have been rarely examined. We here investigated how variability in maternal care received among female rat siblings (measured four times daily on postnatal days 4, 6, 8, and 10) relates to the siblings' later emotional and m… Show more

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
2
1
1

Citation Types

2
19
0

Year Published

2016
2016
2021
2021

Publication Types

Select...
7

Relationship

1
6

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 13 publications
(21 citation statements)
references
References 129 publications
2
19
0
Order By: Relevance
“…Other studies, including our own, have demonstrated that mothers also show variation in their maternal licking to different pups within the litter . We found that total inter‐individual LG received is associated with differences in stress reactivity at adulthood .…”
Section: Introductionsupporting
confidence: 60%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…Other studies, including our own, have demonstrated that mothers also show variation in their maternal licking to different pups within the litter . We found that total inter‐individual LG received is associated with differences in stress reactivity at adulthood .…”
Section: Introductionsupporting
confidence: 60%
“…[16][17][18] Other studies, including our own, have demonstrated that mothers also show variation in their maternal licking to different pups within the litter. [19][20][21][22][23][24] We found that total inter-individual LG received is associated with differences in stress reactivity at adulthood. 23,24 The effects of average licking bout length received by individual pups on their later-life behaviour have not been explored.…”
mentioning
confidence: 68%
“…Work by Olazábal et al (2004) also supports this idea, in that they found that juveniles have higher tissue content of serotonin and its metabolite compared to nulliparous adult female rats in brain regions involved in maternal behavior including the medial preoptic area (mPOA). We have shown that postpartum rats have higher serotonin turnover in the mPOA and nearby bed nucleus of the stria terminalis compared to nulliparous adult females (Lonstein et al, ; Smith et al, ), and that cortical TPH2 is positively associated with maternal responsiveness in sensitized virgins (Ragan et al, ). Thus, aspects of the midbrain and forebrain serotonin systems are upregulated in female rats that are prone to display mothering (i.e., juveniles, nulliparous adults with juvenile alloparental experience, and postpartum dams) compared to maternally resistant females (i.e., nulliparous inexperienced adults).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 97%
“…Another factor that may have been relevant for our alloparentally experienced females in Experiment 2 is that rodent mothers that are simultaneously pregnant and lactating are less responsive to offspring cues, spend more time outside the nest, and nurse less often (Konig & Markl, 1987;Krackow & Hoeck, 1989;Naguib, Kober, & Trillmich, 2010;Uriarte et al, 2008). Daughters that receive less maternal care are less prone to being maternally sensitized as adults (Champagne, Diorio, Sharma, & Meaney, 2001;Ragan, Harding, & Lonstein, 2015), and this may have countered any positive influence of alloparental experience on our females' later maternal responsiveness.…”
Section: Juvenile Alloparental Experience and Later Maternal Responsimentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The functional aspects of this interaction could be addressed by measuring gene expression/activity differences arising from different combinations of PRKG1 and serotonin transporter genetic variants in cell culture. Recent rat studies show a role for serotonin system in regulation of maternal behavior and in the effect of maternal licking on serotonin-based pup development (Yang et al, 2015; Ragan, Harding, & Lonstein, 2016). Hence, regulation of the serotonin transporter by PRKG1 and its interaction with early adversity provides one potential biological mechanism for the effects observed in the present study.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%