2018
DOI: 10.1007/s12519-018-0136-8
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Association of sleep quality with sociodemographic factors and lifestyle in adolescents from southern Brazil

Abstract: Adolescents who were most likely to report poor sleep quality were female, those whose mothers had a higher educational level and had low aerobic fitness. Students with sedentary risk behavior were less likely of reporting poor sleep quality.

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Cited by 18 publications
(17 citation statements)
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“…Contrastingly, self-employment, being a non-regular employee, and drinking alcohol more than 3 times per week were inversely associated with poor mental health conditions. In general, these results were consistent with the results obtained from previous cross-sectional studies that addressed the risk factors of poor mental health conditions, with unemployment and low levels of disposable income being cited in two [33,35], short sleep duration being cited in three [38,[42][43][44][45], and lack of physical exercise being cited in five studies [15,19,40]. Thus, it is confirmed that these factors are those most associated with effects on mental health conditions in terms of cross-sectional and longitudinal direction.…”
Section: Plos Onesupporting
confidence: 91%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…Contrastingly, self-employment, being a non-regular employee, and drinking alcohol more than 3 times per week were inversely associated with poor mental health conditions. In general, these results were consistent with the results obtained from previous cross-sectional studies that addressed the risk factors of poor mental health conditions, with unemployment and low levels of disposable income being cited in two [33,35], short sleep duration being cited in three [38,[42][43][44][45], and lack of physical exercise being cited in five studies [15,19,40]. Thus, it is confirmed that these factors are those most associated with effects on mental health conditions in terms of cross-sectional and longitudinal direction.…”
Section: Plos Onesupporting
confidence: 91%
“…Regarding exercise, the lack of physical activity could be a risk factor for poor mental health conditions [ 39 ], and some studies report that physical activity could play a significant role in promoting better mental health outcomes [ 15 , 19 , 39 41 ]. Moreover, one previous study reported that adolescents who had low aerobic fitness were more likely to report poorer sleep quality [ 42 ]. Based on these findings, there is a need to promote regular practice of physical activities in order to improve quality of sleep and mental health conditions, mainly because it helps reduce stress levels.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…We adjusted for several sociodemographic and family characteristics linked with adolescent sleep and physical activity behavior 4951 , including sex (male vs. female), age, race (Black, Hispanic, other or missing, vs. White), mother’s education (college or graduate school, high school or equivalent, some college, vs. less than high school), family structure (biological mother, biological mother with new partner, biological father only or with new partner or other primary caregiver, vs. biological mother and biological father), and household income to national poverty threshold (<49%, 50–99%, 100–199%, 200–299%, vs. >300%). We also adjusted for body mass index measured during the home visit (BMI; age percentile).…”
Section: Methodsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…For instance, while adults may encounter sleep problems due to anxiety or depression, adolescents may have sleep problems attributable to a delayed sleep cycle [28]. Furthermore, adolescent sleep patterns may indeed have gender differences, with adolescent girls having a greater tendency toward sleep quality problems than adolescent boys [29, 30]. For instance, female adolescents tend to have more nocturnal awakenings and more nightmares than their male counterparts [31, 32].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%