2018
DOI: 10.1001/jamadermatol.2017.5799
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Abstract: IMPORTANCE The association between pemphigus and neurologic diseases was not evaluated systematically in the past. In a recent uncontrolled cross-sectional study, Parkinson disease was found to be significantly associated with pemphigus; in the same study, epilepsy had a nonsignificant association with pemphigus. Several case reports have suggested that pemphigus coexists with multiple sclerosis and dementia. OBJECTIVE To estimate the association between pemphigus and 4 neurologic conditions (dementia, epileps… Show more

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Cited by 15 publications
(6 citation statements)
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References 28 publications
(35 reference statements)
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“…Anxiety and depression have been reported to correlate with disease activity ( Tabolli et al., 2008 ) and to persist during quiescent periods ( Tabolli et al., 2014 ). A large-scale population-based cross-sectional study disclosed an association of pemphigus with several neurological conditions, namely dementia (OR = 2.0; 95% CI = 1.8–2.2), epilepsy (OR = 1.8; 95% CI = 1.4–2.3), and Parkinson disease (OR = 2.1; 95% CI = 1.7–2.5) ( Kridin et al., 2018f ). The association of pemphigus with Parkinson disease and epilepsy was demonstrated in an earlier cross-sectional study ( Hsu et al., 2016b ).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Anxiety and depression have been reported to correlate with disease activity ( Tabolli et al., 2008 ) and to persist during quiescent periods ( Tabolli et al., 2014 ). A large-scale population-based cross-sectional study disclosed an association of pemphigus with several neurological conditions, namely dementia (OR = 2.0; 95% CI = 1.8–2.2), epilepsy (OR = 1.8; 95% CI = 1.4–2.3), and Parkinson disease (OR = 2.1; 95% CI = 1.7–2.5) ( Kridin et al., 2018f ). The association of pemphigus with Parkinson disease and epilepsy was demonstrated in an earlier cross-sectional study ( Hsu et al., 2016b ).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The Dsg1, from the desmosomes structure of patients with pemphigus vulgaris, was found to be expressed in the corpus callosum of the mouse brain and was localized around the plasma membrane regions of oligodendrocytes. The desmo-glein1-γ expression is not restricted to the skin, as it is also expressed in the brain, skeletal muscle, and liver, among other tissues (5). at the patients with bullous pemphigoid, BP180 is strongly expressed in the cortex and hippocampus, the neuronal isoforms of BP230 are widely expressed in the human central and peripheral nervous system.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…17 Multiple clinical associations of BP have been described including certain medication, most frequently aldosterone antagonists, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP4) inhibitors, anticholinergics, and dopaminergics 18,19 and comorbidities, most frequently, neuropsychiatric disorders that can be found in 30%-50% of patients. [20][21][22][23][24][25] Further comorbidities include cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, psoriasis, ulcerative colitis and other autoimmune disorders, asthma, haematological malignancies, and atopic dermatitis. 20,[26][27][28][29][30][31][32][33] Despite ample data about associated disorders and medication in BP, only few studies investigated the relation of anti-BP180 and anti-BP230 autoantibodies with these parameters.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%