2011
DOI: 10.1590/s1984-46702011000300013
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Artificial nests as an alternative to studies of arboreal small mammal populations: a five-year study in the Atlantic Forest, Brazil

Abstract: ABSTRACT. Despite the great diversity of Brazilian Atlantic forest small mammals, natural history of most species is unknown due to their cryptic and nocturnal habits, but also due to the inadequacy of methods to capture some species, especially those of arboreal habits. A new technique, based on the use of artificial nests (AN) to record arboreal marsupials, is presented. Artificial nests were combined with traditional live traps to study the population ecology of four didelphid marsupial species. After 62 mo… Show more

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Cited by 6 publications
(2 citation statements)
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“…Tubelis (2000) found lactating female G. microtarsus using bamboo nest boxes on several occasions, and this species also uses tree hollows (Caceres and Pichorim, 2003). More recently, Loretto and Vieira (2011), through the systematic use of a large number of artificial nests, have recorded five species of Didelphidae in such nest-boxes in an Atlantic forest site near Rio de Janeiro (Brazil). Like Hyladelphys, nests built by G. microtarsus are composed mainly of dry leaves and have a central chamber where individuals rest (Caceres and Pichorim 2003).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Tubelis (2000) found lactating female G. microtarsus using bamboo nest boxes on several occasions, and this species also uses tree hollows (Caceres and Pichorim, 2003). More recently, Loretto and Vieira (2011), through the systematic use of a large number of artificial nests, have recorded five species of Didelphidae in such nest-boxes in an Atlantic forest site near Rio de Janeiro (Brazil). Like Hyladelphys, nests built by G. microtarsus are composed mainly of dry leaves and have a central chamber where individuals rest (Caceres and Pichorim 2003).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The first is an Atlantic forest site in Rio de Janeiro state, southeastern Brazil, in the course of an 8-year population dynamics study. Up to 312 artificial nests were set at five heights (0, 2.5, 5, 7.5 and 14-21 m), distributed across three 1.44 ha grids checked monthly from June 2003 to October 2010 (details on experimental design in Loretto & Vieira [14]). All animals recorded in artificial nests were marked and released after data collection.…”
Section: Methodsmentioning
confidence: 99%