2019
DOI: 10.1108/imds-08-2018-0368
|View full text |Cite
|
Sign up to set email alerts
|

Artificial Intelligence in FinTech: understanding robo-advisors adoption among customers

Abstract: Purpose Considering the increasing impact of Artificial Intelligence (AI) on financial technology (FinTech), the purpose of this paper is to propose a research framework to better understand robo-advisor adoption by a wide range of potential customers. It also predicts that personal and sociodemographic variables (familiarity with robots, age, gender and country) moderate the main relationships. Design/methodology/approach Data from a web survey of 765 North American, British and Portuguese potential users o… Show more

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
1
1
1
1

Citation Types

12
279
0
2

Year Published

2019
2019
2024
2024

Publication Types

Select...
9

Relationship

2
7

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 336 publications
(293 citation statements)
references
References 60 publications
12
279
0
2
Order By: Relevance
“…Attitudes toward robots are shaped by culture (Bartneck, Suzuki, Kanda, & Nomura, 2007;Belanche, Casaló, & Flavián, 2019). Some evidence suggests Japanese customers are more prone to accept robots (MacDorman et al, 2009), and this trend might extend to other Asian cultures (Rau, Li, & Li, 2009).…”
Section: Culturementioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…Attitudes toward robots are shaped by culture (Bartneck, Suzuki, Kanda, & Nomura, 2007;Belanche, Casaló, & Flavián, 2019). Some evidence suggests Japanese customers are more prone to accept robots (MacDorman et al, 2009), and this trend might extend to other Asian cultures (Rau, Li, & Li, 2009).…”
Section: Culturementioning
confidence: 99%
“…Thus, customer involvement strongly determines service robot acceptance, as far as it is related to customer motivations and risk perceptions (Dholakia, 2001). Investing a small amount in a fund managed by a financial robo-advisor may seem like a game, but customers instead might reject a robo-advisor when they invest vast sums or to obtain a mortgage (Belanche et al, 2019). In a complementary sense, customer involvement could be increased by situational engagement induced by interacting with a robot, such as when customers enjoy the novel experience of interacting with a robot agent for the first time (Aaltonen et al, 2017).…”
Section: Involvement Levelmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Previous literature focused widely on the concept of attitude and its influence on individuals' behavioral intentions, as proposed in the TPB model. Among other contexts, the influence of attitude was analyzed as a precursor of behavioral intentions in subjects' choices of tourist destinations [63], digital press [64], electronic public services [65], mobile commerce [66], and artificial intelligence services [67].…”
Section: The Influence Of Attitudesmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The increased digitalization of financial practices calls for a deeper inquiry into the role of non-human actors in enrolling consumers into the financial system. Studies have explored how robo-advisors promote the formation of healthy investor subjects by reducing risk through automating portfolio diversification and correcting behavioral (cognitive and emotional) bias ( D’Acunto et al, 2019 ) and examined the factors influencing their adoption ( Belanche et al, 2019 ). While Hayes (2019) has focused on the disciplining power of sociotechnical assemblages of robo-advisors in controlling investor behavior, the role of robo-advisors in shaping the experiences of financial subjects within the financialization of daily life has not been studied thus far.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%