2020
DOI: 10.21203/rs.3.rs-29373/v1
View full text |Buy / Rent full text
Preprint
|
Sign up to set email alerts
|

Abstract: Background Artificial intelligence (AI) has been described as the “fourth industrial revolution” with transformative and global implications, including in healthcare, public health, and global health. AI approaches hold promise for improving health systems worldwide, as well as individual and population health outcomes. While AI may have the potential to advance health equity within and between countries, we must consider the ethical implications of its deployment in order to mitigate its potential harms, part… Show more

Help me understand this report
View published versions

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
1

Citation Types

0
1
0

Year Published

2021
2021
2021
2021

Publication Types

Select...
1

Relationship

0
1

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 2 publications
(1 citation statement)
references
References 46 publications
(128 reference statements)
0
1
0
Order By: Relevance
“…71,72 Second, our proposed ethics and governance framework should include mechanisms that draw active participation from a wider range of stakeholders, especially NHP, patients, and caregivers. The regulatory principles set out by the IMDRF are consistent with ethical emphasis on involving more stakeholders, 73 but they nevertheless are directed mainly at software developers and sponsoring organizations, with safety and efficacy as paramount concerns. As wearables and data generated by them become more pervasive, other technical and attending normative considerations relating to patient acceptance (including unobtrusiveness, ruggedness, and user-friendliness) and behavioral change will be important.…”
Section: A Dedicated Ethics and Governance Frameworkmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…71,72 Second, our proposed ethics and governance framework should include mechanisms that draw active participation from a wider range of stakeholders, especially NHP, patients, and caregivers. The regulatory principles set out by the IMDRF are consistent with ethical emphasis on involving more stakeholders, 73 but they nevertheless are directed mainly at software developers and sponsoring organizations, with safety and efficacy as paramount concerns. As wearables and data generated by them become more pervasive, other technical and attending normative considerations relating to patient acceptance (including unobtrusiveness, ruggedness, and user-friendliness) and behavioral change will be important.…”
Section: A Dedicated Ethics and Governance Frameworkmentioning
confidence: 99%