2017
DOI: 10.1590/1806-9282.63.11.923
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Animal experimentation: A look into ethics, welfare and alternative methods

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Cited by 22 publications
(13 citation statements)
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“…The ethics of using animals in research have long been an issue (1)(2)(3). More recently the reproducibility of animal research outcomes has also raised concerns (4)(5)(6)(7)(8) because the physical and social environment of the laboratory provide significant sources for a range of stimuli that can influence an animal's physiology and behavior, its welfare, and scientific outcomes (9).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The ethics of using animals in research have long been an issue (1)(2)(3). More recently the reproducibility of animal research outcomes has also raised concerns (4)(5)(6)(7)(8) because the physical and social environment of the laboratory provide significant sources for a range of stimuli that can influence an animal's physiology and behavior, its welfare, and scientific outcomes (9).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Most advances in modern medicine were made possible through animal trials [1,2]. With growing public consciousness, animal welfare became a more and more important factor in laboratory animal science [3,4].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Under the guidance of the 3R principle, in 2019, the US Environmental Protection Agency proposed to phase out any experiments on mammals by 2035 (U.S. EPA Holds Inaugural Conference on Reducing Animal Testing for Chemical Safety, 2019). Some scholars recommended using new methods ( Fernandes and Pedroso, 2017 ) to replace animal experiments. These methods include in vitro tests (tissues and cells); non-invasive clinical research on human volunteers; the use of species (e.g., shrimp and daphnia larvae) that are not listed as protected animals; computer simulation, etc.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%