2014
DOI: 10.1590/0102-33062014abb3433
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Allelopathic effects of Sonchus oleraceus L. on the germination and seedling growth of crop and weed species

Abstract: We assessed the allelopathic effects of the aqueous extract of Sonchus oleraceus dry shoots on the germination and seedling growth of Trifolium alexandrinum, three weed species (Brassica nigra, Chenopodium murale and Melilotus indicus) and S. oleraceus itself. We assayed four different concentrations of the aqueous extract (w v −1 ): 1%, 2%, 3% and 4%. To determine whether the effects of the extract were attributable to the presence of allelopathic compounds, its osmotic potential or both, we prepared concentr… Show more

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Cited by 47 publications
(51 citation statements)
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References 34 publications
(37 reference statements)
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“…In general, this study has confirmed that both plant residue and root exudates of S. oleraceus had a common inhibitory effect on the flavonoid concentrations in the target legumes. This influence could be attributed to the phenolics such as ferulic-, caffeic-, syringic-and p-hydroxybenzoic acids, which were previously detected in plant residue and root exudates of S. oleraceus (Gomaa et al 2014;Hassan et al 2014a;b). Moreover, the plant tissues of S. oleraceus were also reported to contain considerable contents of alkaloids, tannins and saponins (Gomaa et al 2014).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 89%
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“…In general, this study has confirmed that both plant residue and root exudates of S. oleraceus had a common inhibitory effect on the flavonoid concentrations in the target legumes. This influence could be attributed to the phenolics such as ferulic-, caffeic-, syringic-and p-hydroxybenzoic acids, which were previously detected in plant residue and root exudates of S. oleraceus (Gomaa et al 2014;Hassan et al 2014a;b). Moreover, the plant tissues of S. oleraceus were also reported to contain considerable contents of alkaloids, tannins and saponins (Gomaa et al 2014).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 89%
“…This influence could be attributed to the phenolics such as ferulic-, caffeic-, syringic-and p-hydroxybenzoic acids, which were previously detected in plant residue and root exudates of S. oleraceus (Gomaa et al 2014;Hassan et al 2014a;b). Moreover, the plant tissues of S. oleraceus were also reported to contain considerable contents of alkaloids, tannins and saponins (Gomaa et al 2014). These were suggested as possible allelopathic candidates which interact with several enzymes causing deviations from the standard biosynthetic pathways of secondary metabolites (Einhellig 2004).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 89%
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“…These chemical compounds, known as allelochemicals, are secondary metabolites produced naturally by plant species (Ma et al 2012;Gomaa et al 2014). Previous studies have revealed that the allelopathic effects of invasive plant species, including C. canadensis (Djurdjević et al 2011;, on co-occurring species are mainly due to secondary metabolites (Svensson et al 2013;Macel et al 2014).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Furthermore, the use of allelochemicals extracts from several plant species has been investigated for weed control. For instance, extracts from Eugenia dysenterica (Pina, Borghetti, Silveira, & Pereira, 2009), Sonchus oleraceus (Gomaa et al, 2014), and Sorghum bicolor (Amali, Jayasurya, & Ignacimuthu, 2014) have been shown to inhibit the germination and growth of plants. Moreover, molecular studies of genes associated with allelochemical compounds will help to understand the molecular mechanisms involved in allelopathic responses, which can support bioengineering programs to enhance the effectiveness of allelochemicals.…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%