2019
DOI: 10.1002/cnm.3282
|View full text |Cite
|
Sign up to set email alerts
|

A new finite‐element shell model for arterial growth and remodeling after stent implantation

Abstract: The goal of this paper is to study computationally how blood vessels adapt when they are exposed to a mechanobiological insult, namely, a sudden change of their biomechanical conditions such as proteolytic injuries or implantation.Adaptation occurs through growth and remodeling (G&R), consisting of mass production or removal of structural proteins, such as collagen, until restoring the initial homeostatic biomechanical conditions. In some circumstances, the initial conditions can never be recovered, and arteri… Show more

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
1
1
1
1

Citation Types

3
21
0

Year Published

2020
2020
2023
2023

Publication Types

Select...
7
1

Relationship

3
5

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 20 publications
(24 citation statements)
references
References 40 publications
(75 reference statements)
3
21
0
Order By: Relevance
“…Note that the computational efficiency of this rate-independent G&R formulation is comparable to that obtained for hyperelastic computations, for which we used the same mesh, boundary conditions, applied loads, and incremental steps along with Eqs. (49) and (50), and, hence, is expected to be comparable as well to that obtained by efficient rate-dependent G&R formulations (e.g., in 2D FE analyses [37]). Lastly, because mechanobiologically equilibrated G&R is not constrained isochorically (recall Remark 1), no special formulations were needed to prevent volumetric locking during these computations, a numerical issue characteristic of nearly incompressible elastic or distortional elastoplastic responses [24,38], but also transient elastic responses during G&R [36,39].…”
Section: Computation Of the Original Homeostatic State (Stage I)supporting
confidence: 66%
“…Note that the computational efficiency of this rate-independent G&R formulation is comparable to that obtained for hyperelastic computations, for which we used the same mesh, boundary conditions, applied loads, and incremental steps along with Eqs. (49) and (50), and, hence, is expected to be comparable as well to that obtained by efficient rate-dependent G&R formulations (e.g., in 2D FE analyses [37]). Lastly, because mechanobiologically equilibrated G&R is not constrained isochorically (recall Remark 1), no special formulations were needed to prevent volumetric locking during these computations, a numerical issue characteristic of nearly incompressible elastic or distortional elastoplastic responses [24,38], but also transient elastic responses during G&R [36,39].…”
Section: Computation Of the Original Homeostatic State (Stage I)supporting
confidence: 66%
“…Including CMT in future fluid-solid simulations will extend our prior work 58 to subject-specific geometries and large displacements and thereby improve the understanding of the interplay between altered hemodynamics and vascular adaptation. Since the current shell formulation is based only on displacement degrees of freedom, it also enables standard integration with the methodologies proposed in literature to perform acute stress analysis on stents 59 , to investigate vascular adaptation following the stent implantation 60 , and indeed to consider a host of clinical interventions for patient-specific geometries.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…In the last two decades, collagen fiber dispersion has been included into the models as a key contributor to the mechanical response of the aortic wall 75–78 . AAA progression is usually associated with a loss of elastin 72,125 as well as structural changes of the elastin and collagen fiber network 72,156 with increased fiber dispersion 17,57 leading to a more isotropic behavior. Thus simplified isotropic models are widely used for AAA wall modeling 63,72,136 .…”
Section: Modeling Evarmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Numerical models can be an interesting alternative option for studying influencing factors in sac expansion/shrinkage. Only one numerical model has ever been published on aneurysm adaptation after EVAR 156 . In that original study, a 2D finite‐element axisymmetric shell model was developed for simulating G&R after stent‐graft implantation.…”
Section: Predictive Modeling In Clinical Applications: Mitigating Evar Complications and Optimizing Evar Proceduresmentioning
confidence: 99%