2008
DOI: 10.1002/da.20347
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Abstract: Neuroimaging studies using angry or contemptuous human facial photographic stimuli have suggested amygdala hyper-responsivity in social anxiety disorder (SAD). We sought to determine if an angry "schematic face" (simple line drawing) would evoke exaggerated amygdalar responses in SAD patients compared with healthy control (HC) subjects. Angry, happy, and neutral schematic faces were overtly presented to matched cohorts of 11 SAD and 11 HC subjects for passive viewing, whereas brain functional magnetic resonanc… Show more

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Cited by 169 publications
(132 citation statements)
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“…Unless future studies with larger, multiracial samples confirm that these findings are robust across gender and race/ethnicity, race/ethnicity of the facial stimuli could pose an obstacle in eventually translating the current findings and methodology toward clinical use. In this case, use of schematic face stimuli could be explored to preclude any confounds due to racial bias (Evans et al, 2008).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Unless future studies with larger, multiracial samples confirm that these findings are robust across gender and race/ethnicity, race/ethnicity of the facial stimuli could pose an obstacle in eventually translating the current findings and methodology toward clinical use. In this case, use of schematic face stimuli could be explored to preclude any confounds due to racial bias (Evans et al, 2008).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…These studies usually involve exposing participants to stimuli with direct diagnostic relevance to their condition. For example, pictures of spiders presented to people with a spider phobia 1 and pictures of angry faces presented to people with a social phobia 2 are common task-driven paradigms used in these research programs. Studies of this sort have shown that hyperactivation of amygdala and insula-activity strongly correlated with fear response-is common to PTSD, [3][4][5][6][7] OCD, 8 SP, [9][10][11][12] SAD, [13][14][15] and PD.…”
Section: Limitationsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…This suggests that the amygdala and the fear circuitry may be major players in processing emotional facial expressions, but still, the amygdala works collaboratively, and these studies suggest that amygdala couplings may also differentiate individuals with SAD from healthy controls. Interestingly, hyper-responsiveness to emotional faces differentiates SAD from other anxiety disorders (Blair et al, 2008b), and it has repeatedly been shown that social anxiety symptom severity predicts amygdala responsivity (Evans et al, 2008;Goldin, Manber, Hakimi, Canli, & Gross, 2009a;Phan, Fitzgerald, Nathan, & Tancer, 2006). Furthermore, Goldin et al (2009a) found that the differences between SAD and controls were specific to social threats (i.e., emotional faces) and that the SAD hyper-responsiveness was located in in the parahippocampal gyrus.…”
Section: Reaction Tasksmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Typically, the participants are instructed to match two out of three faces that share a common feature, e.g., emotional valence. Such tasks are a reliable predictor of amygdala, and insula reactivity in healthy individuals (Fusar-Poli et al, 2009), and have repeatedly been shown to evoke elevated amygdala responses in SAD individuals, relative to matched healthy controls (Evans et al, 2008;Stein, Goldin, Sareen, Zorrilla, & Brown, 2002;Yoon, Fitzgerald, Angstadt, McCarron, & Phan, 2007). See also review by Schulz et al (2013).…”
Section: Reaction Tasksmentioning
confidence: 99%