2011 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems 2011
DOI: 10.1109/iros.2011.6048347
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Abstract: Robust climbing in unstructured environment has been one of the long-standing challenges in robotics research. Among others, the control of large adhesion forces is still an important problem that significantly restricts the locomotion performance of climbing robots. The main contribution of this paper is to propose a novel approach to autonomous robot climbing which makes use of Hot Melt Adhesion (HMA). The HMA material is known as a very economical solution to achieve large adhesion forces, and the forces ca… Show more

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Cited by 6 publications
(9 citation statements)
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“…Osswald [7] proposed using hot melt adhesive (HMA) to reach robotic mountaineering locomotion by means of this process. For this, motor is used as basic drive function.…”
Section: ____________________________________________________________mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Osswald [7] proposed using hot melt adhesive (HMA) to reach robotic mountaineering locomotion by means of this process. For this, motor is used as basic drive function.…”
Section: ____________________________________________________________mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Thermal bonding requires a climbing robot to attach itself onto a surface with heated HMAs. HMAs may come from an onboard supplier [14], [15], or may be preloaded and kept on a robot's feet [16]. A bonding area can be formed between the robot and the surface during cooling, which can be either passive (as in [15] and this paper), or active with Peltier elements or fans [14], [16].…”
Section: A Attachment Through Thermal Bondingmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The former way requires longer time for heating up, but a small motor force would be enough for detachment [14]. The latter way can save the heating time, but it requires a relatively large motor force [16] or a torsion [15].…”
Section: B Detachmentmentioning
confidence: 99%
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